Wine Spectator Review of “Money, Taste, and Wine” and a Shameless Gift Idea

The end of the year is upon us and you know what that means! Time to wrap those holiday gifts and time for Wine Spectator, America’s best-selling wine magazine, to announce their list of Top 100 wines for 2015.

Top Wines … and Book Reviews, Too

The Top 100  issue of Wine Spectator is also the annual book review issue and I was honored to have my most recent book, Money, Taste and Wine: It’s Complicated, included in the collection. In fact it is the lead review.

Thanks to Tom Matthews (who wrote the review) and the other Wine Spectator editors for this. So many great wine books were released this year that it is an honor just to make the list.

Here’s a list of the other books in the review article. Nice company!

  • Barolo MGA by Alessandro Masnaghetti
  • Tangled Vines by Frances Dinkelspiel
  • A Natural History of Wine by Ian Tattersall and Rob DeSalle
  • Wine, Moon and Stars by Gérard Betrand
  • American Wine by Tom Acitelli
  • The Winemaker by Richard G Peterson
  • True Taste by Matt Kramer and
  • Thirsty Dragon by Suzanne Mustacich

Caffeinated, Catchy and Quick

Wine Spectator had some nice things to say about Money, Taste and Wine. My favorite line is “A caffeinated writing style, catchy themes and rapid jumps from one subject to the next make the book a quick and lively read.” That’s sounds a little like a literary tasting note!

That’s not to say that they liked everything about the book and I’m taking their constructive criticism as a challenge to do even better as I work on my next book, tentatively scheduled for 2017.

Here’s the Shameless Part

In the meantime, do you have a wine lover on your gift list? If so, you might want to consider a book — best thing ever to give or receive, don’t you think? OK, maybe next-best to wine itself. Here’s my Amazon list of favorite gift books, perfect for your favorite wine friends.

Talk about shameless self-promotion. Cheers, everyone!

Gourmand International Award for “Money, Taste, and Wine”

I’ve just learned that my new book Money, Taste, and Wine: It’s Complicated has won an international award for best drinks writing in a U.S. book this year.

The award comes from Gourmand International and will be presented in Yantai, China on  May 28, 2016 at the annual awards ceremony. As the U.S. winner, Money, Taste, and Wine is a finalist for the “Best in the World” award in this category, the winner of which will be revealed in Yantai. Very exciting!

The other national finalists and winners in other categories of the awards will be posted on Gourmand International website in February.

Sincere thanks to the Gourmand International  judges for this honor. Here is a video about the 2015 awards in Yantai. Enjoy!

Two Faces of Wine Innovation & Sustainability: SIMEI and Amorim

Sue and I recently returned from the biennial  SIMEI trade show in Milan. SIMEI stands for Salone Internazionale Macchine per EnologIi e Imbottigiiamento, which translates as International Enological and Bottling Equipment Exhibition.

SIMEI By the Numbers

The trade show’s focus  is narrow (equipment and technology) compared to the all-things-wine Unified Wine & Grape Symposium here in the U.S, which is my point of reference for these things. But its scope is broad, including not just the wine industry since tanks, bottling equipment, etc. are used in other sectors such as olive oil and so forth. No wonder so many people found a reason to attend.

By the numbers (according to SIMEI’s press release) there were 46,000 visitors from 90 countries, 600 exhibitors from 28 countries, and 12,000 tons of equipment and products displayed. The trade show took up 4 huge halls in the vast Fieromilano Rho exhibition center. The video below gives you a sense of the scale and scene.

Technology was the star of the show and one of the highlights was a gala dinner where awards were presented for outstanding new innovations. Wines & Vines reported on the top innovations.

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Sustainability Congress: Theory vs Practice

SIMEI is organized by the Unione Italiana Vini (Italian Wine Association), whose members account for 70 percent of wine production in Italy. They organized two international congresses in conjunction with the trade show as well as a number of presentations and demonstrations that took place in the halls among the big machines.

The congress on “Sustainable Viticulture as a Tribute to Wine Quality” followed up on a similar session in SIMEI 2013. The earlier meeting worked to agree a universal definition of sustainability in the wine industry, which is either easy or difficult depending upon how you approach the question.

It is easy to agree in theory that sustainability includes economic sustainability, environmental sustainability, and social sustainability “pillars” — this is now conventional wisdom. But just what exactly is meant by each concept and how can they be evaluated in practice? Not so easy.

The 2015 meeting probed some of the issues and trade-offs between and among the three pillars. One line of discussion noted the need for sustainability to be certified according to objective criteria, which is important if the concept is to mean anything. But what and whose criteria should be used?

I think there was a consensus in the room that a common or universal set of standards was needed (“harmonization” is a term often used here). Although I am probably wrong about this as I am about many things, I spoke in opposition to the single-minded pursuit of universal standards.

I see each country or region starting from a different base and often facing different economic, environmental, and social issues and constraints. I argued that at this moment it is more important that each region make the most progress it can towards sustainability. I cited programs in South Africa and New Zealand as good examples.milano

I worry that putting the main emphasis on having universal standards will  result either in diluted “least common denominator” rules or will squeeze stakeholders out of the sustainability movement altogether, limiting its reach and effectiveness, because the common rules do  not address their particular situations and concerns.

One size does not necessarily fit all, even if there is some wiggle room built in. It took only a moment for an EU representative to rise and explain to the audience why I was wrong, but I will stick to my viewpoint.

I admit that my views are based on an American way of looking at things (I love the grand Federalist laboratory that is the United States), but I don’t think this is exclusively an American attitude. I do not see universal wine sustainability rules happening soon within the US much less on a global scale.

Amorim’s Sustainability Initiative

If turning theory into practice was not easily accomplished in the congress center, there was plenty of evidence of strong efforts out in the trade show. Sustainability isn’t just ethics or philosophy, it is also good business and many of the exhibitors have embraced this concept.

An example is Amorim, the innovative Portuguese producer of corks for the global wine industry and many other cork products. We stopped by the Amorim exhibit and talked with Carlos de Jesus, marketing director of Amorim, and Carlos Santos, the head of Amorim Cork Italia. They were both excited to tell us about Amorim’s cork recycling programs, which tick all three sustainability boxes.

Cork is a natural product so it would seem that recycling it in a sustainable way would be easy, but it is not. You cannot, for example, simply re-use a wine cork on another bottle of wine — health and safety laws as well as common sense rule that out.

So the challenge is to collect the used corks and then repurpose them in some way that adds value to society without bankrupting all involved. The Amorim approach (which is implemented in different specific ways in each country where it has been rolled out) partners with local non-profit groups to collect the corks, keeping them out of the landfill.

Amorim pays these groups for the corks (thus supporting their social programs) and then grinds up the cork and partners with various producers to make useful products. In the U.S. you might have seen shoes with soles made from recycled cork, for example.

In Italy the cork is used to make the sort of building insulation panels that would otherwise by made out of foam. Cork is an excellent insulator and the price is competitive with the conventional product.

The Amorim program promotes social and environmental goals. What about economics? Well, I was told, this isn’t designed to be a profit center for Amorim. The idea is not to make a lot of middleman money reselling the corks that the non-profits have collected, but rather to facilitate the recycling system itself.

Many Small Steps Can Add Up

But that doesn’t mean that it isn’t good for business, Carlos de Jesus stressed. Amorim mainly markets to its direct buyers — the wineries — and doesn’t have as much interaction as they would like with the people who ultimately open the bottles. Programs like this give Amorim an opportunity to tell cork’s sustainability story directly to consumers and to establish a very positive image of cork with them. And since producers want their products to appeal to consumers, if consumers have a reason to choose cork  … well you can see where this can lead.

Amorin’s program is important even if it is a small step toward the goal of sustainability. If each sector of the industry can search out an appropriate strategy (and each region of the wine world do the same), then all these small steps can potentially add up to the more sustainable future that is the goal.

immagine-etico

Book Reviews: “Thirsty Dragon” and “A Decent Bottle of Wine in China”

Brief reviews of two new books on wine in China.

Suzanne Mustacich, Thirsty Dragon: China’s Lust for Bordeaux and the Threat to the World’s Best Wines (Henry Holt, 2015).

Suzanne Mustacich’s new book is rightly being hailed as one of the wine books of the year (the Financial Times named it one of 2015’s best business books). It is a great read and deserves both critical acclaim and your attention.

I have tried to follow the China wine scene closely over the last ten years, but I still found that I learned something new in every chapter. Mustacich deftly connects the dots and supplies depth and detail. The stories she tells are incredibly interesting and relevant. Each chapter reads like a New Yorker magazine investigative reporting piece — that’s meant as high praise.

In broad terms, you might say that Thirsty Dragon is a love story. First China discovers that it loves Bordeaux, then Bordeaux realizes that it desperately needs China whether it loves her or not, then finally China realizes that its lust for Bordeaux might have been a mistake. In the end we have Chinese-owned Bordeaux chateaux and French investments in China and, in a funny way, if is hard to know where one set of influences and dependencies stop and another begins. Bordeaux may never be the same after its China fling and China has changed a lot, too.pogo-we-have-met-800wi

Along the way we are introduced to many fascinating personalities, both the usual big time suspects and smaller players whose stories reveal a great deal.  This is the perfect book if you are interested in China or in Bordeaux or in wine or in how globalization is changing business culture. Highly recommended.

The subtitle suggests a “threat to the world’s best wines” and I struggled just a bit trying to decide what Mustacich meant by this. Is the threat due to fraud and counterfeit, which are analyzed in detail here? Is the threat the collapse of Bordeaux’s en primeur system, which is analyzed in detail. Or is it the of the rapidly growing Chinese wine industry itself, with its peculiar characteristics?

Certainly Bordeaux has reason to feel threatened by changing economic circumstances, but it is not clear who is to blame for that! Sometimes, as Pogo said, we are our own worst enemies.

I was fortunate to moderate a panel discussion of wine in China that featured Suzanne Mustacich and I asked her about the threat. Two threats, she said. The first is from the rampant fraud, which undermines the market for top wines. The second was the greed that drove China’s speculative wine bubble. I agree, that’s a real threat — one of those Pogo problems.

Thirsty Dragon is a must read if you want to understand how China is transforming the world of wine.

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Chris Ruffle, A Decent Bottle of Wine in China (Earnshaw Books, 2015).

Chris Ruffle is a Chinese-speaking Yorkshire native who specializes in finance. So it makes perfect sense that he would decide to plant vineyards in Shandong and build a winery designed on the model of a Scottish castle. His quest to produce A Decent Bottle of Wine in China is a very personal account of his ten-year castle-building, vineyard-planting, wine-making journey.

Ruffle writes that he began this book project intending to write one of those popular romantic ex-pat stories like A Year in Provence or Under the Tuscan Sun, but the business side of the winery just wouldn’t be left out. Indeed, much of the book follows the author and his family as they deal with pesky neighbors, inconvenient local officials and inefficient workmen and contractors in a very Year Under the Shandong Sun sort of way.

But the book this really reminds me of is Caro Feely’s excellent Grape Expectations: A Family’s Vineyard Adventure in France. Feely and her family moved from Ireland to France to follow their dream and the winery they restore is nobody’s idea of a castle, but otherwise there many similarities. Both books teach a lot about wine-growing, wine business, the clash of cultures that ex-pats experience, and the power of wine to overcome obstacles.

One big difference is that the Feelys went all in on their project. No day job safety net. Ruffle kept his investment fund job and it is a good thing. Ten years in and with enormous work and investment, his Treaty Port winery is just about breaking even (if, of course, you don’t count the value of his time).

But, and this is the point, he is by his own account finally making that decent bottle of wine in China and not losing too much money in on each sale! A fascinating story, full of great information about China, wine and life.

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These two books could not be more different, but because they are both about wine in China I kept waiting for them to intersect. And they did in at least two places.

Mustacich gives a good account of both Chinese wine investments in France and French projects in China. One of these is a vineyard and winery that DBR Lafite, one of the most famous Bordeaux names, has built-in Shandong. In fact the project is next door to Ruffle’s Treaty Port winery and the first Lafite Chinese vintage was actually made in Ruffle’s cellars.

This would seem to give credibility to Ruffle’s project, and it does, but I feel a little sad for Lafite because Ruffle reports all sorts of mold and fungus problems in the vineyards (not especially good news for nearby Lafite) and, just when it looks like things are getting better, the government decides to build a big highway through both the Treaty Port and Lafite vineyard properties. Yikes!

The award-winning Silver Heights winery is featured in Thirsty Dragon and it makes a cameo appearance in Ruffle’s book. Chris Ruffle and his wife make a trip to visit this highly regarded producer and, at the end, Chris’s wife turns to him and says she’s really glad they went. They are even crazier than you are, she says. Always good to put things in perspective, I guess!

Do you have to be crazy to make a decent bottle of wine (in China or anywhere else)? I will leave that up to you.

Legendary Fred Franzia to Speak at Unified Symposium Luncheon

Sue and I will be at the Unified Wine & Grape Symposium in Sacramento on January 26-28, 2016 where I will once again moderate the State of the Industry session featuring presentations by Steve Fredricks of Turrentine Brokerage, Nat DuBuduo of Allied Grape Growers and Jon Fredrikson of Gomberg, Fredrikson & Associates.

I always look forward to the Wednesday “State of the Industry” panel because the speakers are so well-informed and the information so timely and interesting. But if I am honest, this year I am even more excited about the Tuesday luncheon gathering because that speaker will be the legendary Fred Franzia (a.k.a. Mr Two Buck Chuck) of Bronco Wine. Wouldn’t miss this for the world!

Bronco By the Numbers

Bronco Wine Company is a major force in the U.S. wine industry. According to the most recent Wine Business Monthly report, Bronco’s 20 million annual case volume makes it the fourth largest U.S. wine company after Gallo, The Wine Group, and Constellation Brands. Although Charles Shaw (a.k.a. Two Buck Chuck) is the best known Bronco label, the company has more than 50 brands. One of the products that Bronco does not make is Franzia, the popular box wine, which belongs to The Wine Group. Franzia doesn’t make Franzia? It’s a long story that I will tell another time.

Bronco’s history began in 1973, when Fred Franzia and his brother Joseph met with their cousin John and pledged to go all in to build a new wine company. Equipped with a tiny bank loan, their knowledge of the business side (Fred and Joseph) and of winemaking (John), plus a major measure of determination, they set out on the twisting road that has brought them to their current position.

Their accomplishment is quite breathtaking when you think about it.  Bronco today boasts impressive winemaking facilities, a packaging and distribution center in Napa and about 40,000 acres of vineyards. No, I didn’t make a mistake, the number is 40,000, making Bronco one of the largest vineyard owners in the world.P1100664

The Miracle of Two Buck Chuck

One of Bronco’s greatest achievements, of course, is the success of the Charles Shaw wines sold at Trader Joe’s stores. These clean, balanced, and affordable wines played an important role in the democratization of wine in the United States. So many previously intimidated consumers were drawn into the wine market by Two Buck Chuck and the other wines it inspired or provoked.

I wrote about “the miracle of Two Buck Chuck” in my 2011 book Wine Wars. The quality of these inexpensive wines forced other winemakers to raise their game and give better value, which in turn gave consumers more confidence and expanded the wine market’s reach. If you think about the U.S. wine world before 1973, well it really is a miracle that we have come so far. The Franzias played an important role.

The View from Bronco Wine

What will Fred Franzia talk about at the Unified Symposium luncheon? Obviously I don’t really know, but I hope that he will look back at some of the inspiring figures that he has known in his life in American wine and look ahead at some of the challenges he sees for the future. I’m hoping to be  informed, entertained, and inspired.P1100655

Sue and I had an opportunity to talk about the past, present, and future of American wine with Fred Franzia back in September. Fred invited us to come down to see what a large-scale grape harvest looks like. Fred’s son Joey took us to see the night harvest at a 4000-acre vineyard ranch near Lodi — quite an experience to see the big machines at work under the stars.

We also visited the Napa bottling and distribution center and the main winery in Ceres, where we had lunch with Fred, Joseph, and John Franzia. Then John took us through the working winery (he designed it and supervised its construction), which was receiving grapes picked the night before (more than 300 big truck loads a day at that time).

Big and Bigger

The scale of the Ceres operation got our attention, of course. We saw some tanks that held 350,000 gallons of wine each. Big as they are, they were dwarfed by other tanks that held twice as much. Amazing.

Once we got used to the scale of the Bronco winery we began to appreciate the tremendous attention to detail, which was apparent in all of the other Bronco operations we visited. So many moving parts coordinated so efficiently. Very impressive. We enjoyed the opportunity to sit and chat with Fred in his modest trailer office and to hear some stories from the past and his vision of the future. I’m hoping to hear more along these lines when Fred gives his luncheon talk.

The Name is Shaw, Charlie Shaw

Let me share one story. Fred told us that he was making a call  at a Trader Joe’s store — he still handles that account himself — and struck up a conversation with a young man who was stocking a Charles Shaw display. Fred asked about how the wine was selling and what customers were saying and so on and the clerk asked who he was and why he wanted to know. Well, Fred replied, I’m one of the people who help make this wine — I work at the winery.

Wow, the clerk exclaimed. You’re Charles Shaw? You’re Charlie Shaw! No, no, my  name’s not Shaw, Fred tried to explain, but it was too late and a minute later the store PA system announced that Charles Shaw was visiting the wine aisle. Amazed customers surged to the Two Buck Chuck display to thank their hero and Fred spent the rest of his visit happily autographing wine bottles. A rock-star moment!

I hope I have the details of that story right (and I apologize if I’ve messed up) because it says a something about the pride and personal touch that we found everywhere at Bronco and about the warm enthusiasm that Charlie Shaw inspires in his fans.

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Sue’s photos above show the blur of the Charles Shaw bottling line at the Bronco Napa facility and a tractor driver during night harvest.

Georgia to Host UNWTO Global Wine Tourism Conference in 2016

I think the United Nations has a thing about wine. I recently wrote about the surprising number of wine regions that have received Unesco World Heritage site recognition, for example. Now the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) is getting into the act.

The 1st UNWTO Global Conference on Wine Tourism will be held in the Kakheti wine region of Georgia from 7-9 September 2016. “Wine tourism represents a growing segment with immense opportunities to diversify demand. In the case of Georgia, this potential is well-known and we are very pleased to be holding the first UNWTO Global Conference on Wine Tourism in the country,” according to UNWTO Secretary-General, Taleb Rifai.

Why Georgia? History is part of the story, but it is also true that wine is an effective way to promote tourism and economic development. Come for the wine (and food) and stay for the people, culture, history and geography. Trade and investment flows may follow the wine route, too. Georgian officials appreciate this logic.

“Georgia’s unique wine-making traditions date back 8,000 years and are part of UNESCO’s intangible heritage, creating the ideal base to host the Wine Tourism Conference. Herewith, the country’s recent success in attracting a growing number of tourists, its development in terms of tourism products, branding and marketing present an excellent platform to share best practices, experience and knowledge¨ according to Dimitry Kumsishvili, Minister of Economy and Sustainable Development of Georgia.

U.S. regional wine associations with a strong interest in wine tourism may be able to participate in the Georgia program, but I am not sure about the details.  More information can be found here.

I wrote about wine tourism in my book Extreme Wine, so I am going to be following this initiative closely. Best wishes to Georgia and the UNWTO for a successful inaugural conference.

A Kenyan Wine Mystery: Whatever Happened to Richard Leakey’s Il Masin?

I’m working on a project about wine in Africa and I need some help. Does anyone know if Il Masin in Kenya is still making wine? Here’s the label of their 2005 Pinot Noir. I can find references to Il Masin on the internet up until about 2012 and then … nothing. Are they still around?

Il Masin is interesting in many respects starting with the basics: Pinot Noir in Kenya? Really? But the fascinating thing for me is who is or was behind the project: paleoanthropologist Richard Leakey! 

Here’s a link to the blog that Leakey’s daughter (and his winery partner) Louise maintained until 2011. Whatever happened to Il Masin? Please use the comments function below to leave a message if you have any information.

Thanks in advance for your help!

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