American Association of Wine Economists Conference Program

As I noted last week, the American Association of Wine Economists are meeting in Walla Walla in a few days. I thought you might be interested in the full program, including papers, authors, activities and so on. Lots of interesting wine economics topics and ideas. Enjoy

JUNE 23, 2014 Whitman College, Maxey Hall

8:00 – 9:00

REGISTRATION, Maxey Auditorium Foyer

 

 9:00 – 10:30 Room – Maxey Auditorium  Session #1A: Consumers & Markets
Chair: XXX
Richard Belzer (Regulatory Checkbook) Leveraging consumer ignorance and information search costs to maximize profits in US wine ‘Flash sales': a follow up
Linda L. Lowry, Robin Back (both University of Massachusetts, Amherst) Impact of farm winery legislation S 2582: an act relative to economic development reorganization on Massachusetts wineries
Marc Dressler (University Ludwigshafen, Germany) Exploring success factors in export management – Results of a survey on relevance in the context of the wine business and performance of German producers
Olivier Gergaud (KEDGE Business School, Bordeaux, France), Philippe Masset (Ecole Hôtelière de Lausanne, Switzerland) Using information about web searches to forecast auction prices of fine wines

 

 9:00 – 10:30Room – Maxey 207  Session #1B: Tourism and Economic Impact
Chair: Luigi Galletto (University of Padova, Italy)
Christopher Lucha, Gustavo Ferreira, Martha Walker (all Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg) Virginia wine tourism: a profitability analysis
Luca Rossetto, Luigi Galletto (both University of Padova, Italy) Wine tourist profiles: a comparison between two wine routes in Veneto region
Theodore Lane (Western Regional Science Association), Bill Mundy (Bill Mundy Associates) Walla Walla’s wine-based agro-industrial cluster
Martin Prokes, Kamil Prokes (both Mendel University Brno, Czech Republic) Job creation by investing in the wine sector

 

10:30 – 11:00 Coffee Break
Maxey Auditorium Foyer

 

 11:00 – 12:30Room – Maxey Auditorium  Session #2A: Coffee & FoodChair: Morten Scholer (International Trade Centre, Geneva, Switzerland)
Morten Scholer (International Trade Centre, Geneva, Switzerland) Coffee: the product, the trade and comparison with wine
Samrawit Ebabe (Jimma University, Ethiopia) Constraints to Ethiopian coffee exports from a supply chain management perspective
Peter Roberts (Emory University) Product differentiation, pricing and fair trading in specialty coffee markets
Albert I. Ugochukwu University of Saskatchewan, Jill E. Hobbs. University of Saskatchewan Food product authenticity in agri-food markets: implications for collective reputation
Bernd Frick (University of Paderborn, Germany), Olivier Gergaud (KEDGE Business School, Bordeaux, France), Laure Salais (Institut Paul Bocuse, France) The demand for restaurants in Europe

 

 11:00 – 12:30Room – Maxey 207  Session #2B: Trade and International I
Chair: XXX
Alejandro Gennari, Jimena Estrella. Xavier Brevet (both National University of Cuyo, Mendoza, Argentina) Argentinean wineries’ strategies on export markets
Miguel A. Fierro, Rodrigo Romo Muñoz (both Universidad del Bío-Bío, Chile) Characterization of the Chilean bottled wine market
Cynthia Howson (University of Washington Tacoma), Pierre Ly (University of Puget Sound), Jeff Begun (University of Washington Tacoma) Grape procurement, land rights and industrial upgrading in the Chinese wine industry
Maryline Filippi (University of Bordeaux, France) Elena Garnevka (Massey University, New Zealand) Exporting wine to China from New Zealand and from France. Strategies and perspectives
 11:00 – 12:30Room – Maxey 307  Session #2C: U.S. Wine Market & Industry
Chair: XXX
Raphael Schirmer (University of Bordeaux, France) Drinking wine in the United States of America (from 1850 to the present) through the New York Public Library’s collection “What’s on the menu?”
Jon H. Hanf (Geisenheim University, Germany) Retail branding and its consequences on wine brands
Bradley Rickard (Cornell University), Olivier Gergaud (KEDGE Business School, Bordeaux, France), Hu Wenjing (Cornell University) Trade liberalization in the presence of domestic regulations: likely impacts of the TTIP on wine markets
Robert Hodgson (Fieldbrook Winery) The unimportance of terroir

 

12:30 – 14:00 Lunch Break

 

 14:00 – 15.15Room – Maxey Auditorium

 

PLENARY SESSION:
Welcome and Introduction
 Orley Ashenfelter (Princeton University)    Welcome and Introduction
     
Kevin Pogue (Whitman College)   The Terroirs of the Walla Walla Valley American Viticultural Area
15:15 – 15:45 Coffee Break
Maxey Auditorium Foyer
 15:45 – 18:00Room – Maxey Auditorium  Session #3A: Varietals, Geography, Environment
Chair: Julian Alston (UC Davis)
Kate Fuller, Julian Alston, Olena S. Sambucci. (all UC Davis) The value of powdery mildew resistance in grapes: evidence from California
Julian Alston (UC Davis), Kym Anderson (University of Adelaide) Evolving varietal distinctiveness of US wine regions: comparative evidence from a new global database
Christopher Bitter (University of Washington, Seattle) The evolving geography of the U.S. wine industry
Luigi Galletto, Federica Bianchin, Luigino Barisan (all University of Padova, Italy), Eugenio Pomarici (University of Naples Federico II, Italy) An evaluation of a new drought-resistant rootstock in Italy
Jean-Philippe Roby (Bordeaux Science Agro, France) Viticulture of varietal wines: the dead end of terroir at the time of global warming? Case study of Burgundy
Karl Storchmann (New York University), Peter Griffin (Vanderbilt University) Climate change and vineyard prices

 

 15:45 – 18:00Room – Maxey 207 Session #3B: Wine Investment
Chair: Lee Sanning (Whitman College)
Marie-Claude Pichery (Université de Bourgogne, France), Catherine Pivot (Université Jean Moulin – Lyon 3, France) Wine investment: a profitable alternative investment or simply a long-term pleasure?
Beysül Aytac, Thi Hong Van, Hoang, Cyrille Mandou (all Sup de Co Montpellier Business School, France) Wine: to drink or to invest? A study of wine as a financial asset in a French portfolio context
Philippe Masset, Jean-Philippe Weisskopf (both Ecole Hôtelière de Lausanne, Switzerland) Wine funds – an alternative turning sour?
Philippe Masset, Jean-Philippe Weisskopf (both  Ecole Hôtelière de Lausanne, Switzerland) Wine indices in practice: nicely labeled but slightly corked
Jean-Marie Cardebat (Université de Bordeaux, France), Benoît Faye, Eric Le Fur (both INSEEC Bordeaux, France), Philippe Masset (Ecole Hôtelière de Lausanne, Switzerland)  Is wine still an investable asset?
Benoît Faye, Eric Le Fur (both INSEEC Bordeaux, France) Dynamics of fine wine and asset prices: evidence from short- and long-run co-movements

 

 15:45 -18:00Room – Maxey 306  Session #3C: Quality and Experts IChair: XXX
Robin Golstein (Fearless Critic Media) Do more expensive things generally taste worse?
Omer Gokcekus, Clare Finnegan (both Seton Hall University) Lumping and splitting in expert ratings’ effect on wine prices
Neal Hulkower (McMinnville, OR) Information lost: the unbearable lightness of vintage charts
Ying Lou, Jing Cao, Lynne Stokes (all Southern Methodist University) Comparing measures of rater agreement for wine quality ratings
Dom Cicchetti (Yale University), Arnie Cicchetti (San Anselmo, CA) Assessing reliability when multiple judges taste a single wine
Eric Stuen, Jon Miller, Robert Stone (all University of Idaho) An analysis of consensus of prominent wine critic ratings in the US market
 19:00 – about 23.00
Conference Dinner
Long Shadows
Buses leave from Whitman College at 18:15  

 

 

JUNE 24, 2014 Maxey Hall

 

 9:00 – 10:30Room –Maxey Auditorium  Session #4A: Water, Whiskey, Wine, Food
Chair: XXX
Kevin W. Capehart (American University, Washington, DC) Fine water: a hedonic pricing approach
Ian B. Page (University of Maryland) The economics of whisky: an analysis of imperfect competition when product quality is endogenous
Kenneth Elzinga. University of Virginia, Carol Tremblay. Oregon State University, Victor Tremblay. Oregon State University Craft beer in the USA: history, scope and geography
Yohannes Yehabe (Molde University College, Norway) Assessment of weather impact on the sales of breweries in Norway: a panel data regression approach
Robert Harrington, Lobat Siahmakoun. (both University of Arkansas) Which wine and food elements drive high and low levels of perceived match?
 9:00 – 10:30Room – Maxey 207

 

Session #4B: Wine Demand
Chair:
XXX
Getnet Yitagesu (Unity University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia) A principal component analysis of the demand structure of Wine. The Case of Addis Ababa
Paulina Rytkönen (Södertörn University, Sweden) Wine in a vodka country – changing consumption patterns in Sweden’s way from a rural to an industrial nation
Gary M. Thompson (Cornell University) Wine cellar optimization
Amy Holbrook, Dennis Reynolds (both Washington State University, Pullman) What effect does wine closure type have on perceptions of wine’s appearance, bouquet, Taste, and overall quality? An empirical investigation
Judit Szigeti (Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Hungary), Szilárd Podruzsik, Orsolya Fehér, Péter Gál (all Corvinus University of Budapest, Hungary) Wine affordability for the Hungarian consumers

 

10:30 – 11:00 Coffee Break
Maxey Auditorium Foyer
 9:00 – 10:30Room – Maxey Auditorium

 

Session #5A: Quality & Experts II
Chair: XXX
Adeline Alonso Ugaglia (Bordeaux Science Agro, France), Olivier Gergaud (KEDGE Business School, Bordeaux, France) Restaurant awards and financial rewards: Michelin
Guenter Schamel (Free University of Bolzano, Italy) Points for sale? Examining the market entry of a new wine guide
Orley Ashenfelter (Princeton University), Robin Goldstein (Fearless Critic Media), Craig Riddell (University of British Columbia, Vancouver) Do expert ratings measure quality? The case of restaurant wine lists
Robert Hodgson (Fieldbrook Winery) The fallacy of wine competitions; a ten year retrospective

 

 11:00 – 12:30Room – Maxey 207

 

Session #5B: Marketing
Chair: XXX
Steven Cuellar (Sonoma State University) Measuring the return to social media
Lindsey Higgins, Erica Llanos (both California Polytech, San Luis Obispo) A healthy, but confusing, indulgence? Wine consumers and the health benefits of wine
Benjamin C. Lawrence, Alex M. Susskind, Gary M.  Thompson (all Cornell University) Wine mailing lists
Jon H. Hanf, Oliver Gierig (both Geisenheim University, Germany) Discussion of an Innovative pricing strategy in the context of wine tastings

  

 11:00 – 12:30Room – Maxey 306

 

Session #5C: Industry Organization
Chair: XXX
Paulina Rytkönen (Södertörn University, Sweden) The Swedish wine industry – institutions, knowledge, temperance and regional development in an upcoming wine country
Betsy Carter (Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies, Cologne, Germany) The state versus the market: patterns of producer politics and the construction of status markets
Marc Dressler (University Ludwigshafen, Germany) Organizational levers on reputation and performance – An empirical analysis of German wineries
Florine Livat (KEDGE Business School, Bordeaux, France), Jean-Marie Cardebat. (University of Bordeaux, France) Are there too many appellations in Bordeaux? A renewal of the brand vs. appellation debate
12:30 – 14:00 Lunch Break
 14:00 – 15.30Room – Maxey Auditorium

 

PLENARY SESSION:
Regulation in the U.S. Wine Industry                                 
 Orley Ashenfelter    Princeton University, Princeton
Paul Beveridge   Family Wineries of Washington State, Seattle
John Hinman   Hinman & Carmichael LLP, San Francisco
Allen Shoup   Long Shadows, Walla Walla

 

15:30 – 15:45 Coffee Break
Maxey Auditorium Foyer
 15:45 – 17:15Room – Maxey Auditorium  Session #6A: Supply
Chair: XXX
Nick Vink, Theo Kleynhans, Willem Hoffmann. (Stellenbosch University, South Africa) Financing wine barrels in South Africa: the Vincorp model
Alessandro Muscio, Gianluca Nardone, Antonio Stasi (all Università degli Studi di Foggia, Italy) Perceived technological regimes: an empirical analysis of the wine industry
Lindsey Higgins. Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo Economic stochastic simulation model for small to medium sized wineries
Julien Cadot (ISG Business School, France), Adeline Ugaglia (Bordeaux Sciences Agro, France) The horizon problem in Bordeaux wine cooperatives.

  

 15:45 – 17:15Room – XXX

 

Session #6B: International & Trade II
Chair: XXX
Joachim Ewert (University of Stellenbosch, South Africa), Jon H. Hanf, Erik Schweickert. (Geisenheim University, Germany) South African Cooperatives and the challenge of product quality
Silvia Gatti (University of Bologna, Italy) Designations of origin for wines, labor and cooperatives in Emilia-Romagna between the Censuses of Agriculture 2000 and 2010
Bo Gao, James L. Seale, Zhifeng Gao (all University of Florida) U.S. import demand for wine by country of origin: a differential approach
Leo-Paul Dana (Montpellier Business School, France), Mathieu Labadan (University of Pau, France), Michael Mettrick, Agate Ponder-Sutton. (both University of Canterbury, New Zealand) Interaction among wine makers in New Zealand
17:15 – 17:30 Coffee Break
Maxey Auditorium Foyer

 

 17:30 – 18:00Room – Maxey Auditorium  PLENARY SESSION:
Upshot and Outlook
 Karl Storchmann    New York University, New York

Alejandro Gennari
 
National University of Cuyo, Mendoza, Argentina

 

 19:00 – 23:00 
Dinner
Whitehouse Crawford, Walla Walla
JUNE 25, 2014 09:00 – 18:00
Tour of Walla Walla Vineyards and Wineries
Geological Guide: Kevin Pogue, Whitman College
Lunch at Basel Cellars
Buses leave from the Marcus Whitman Hotel at 9am

 

World Cup 2014: Prime Time for Brazilian Wine?

Faces, the official World Cup Brazilian wine. Click on the image to view a FIFA video about the wine.

The World Cup — FIFA’s celebration of global soccer — kicks off  on Thursday in  São Paulo with host Brazil vs Croatia and will end on July 13 in Rio with the final match at the famous Maracanã stadium, which was originally constructed for the first Post-WWII World Cup in 1950.

That game is likely to be the most-watched single event in world history — talk about prime time!

Soccer is a fast game full of twists and turns and it is notoriously difficult to predict how a big tournament like this will end, but based on history, which I admit does not always repeat itself, I will hazard three observations.

And the Winner Will Be …

First, the winner is likely to be from the western hemisphere, not Europe, Asia , Oceania or Africa.  Only twice has a team from outside the host country’s half of the globe won the big prize: Brazil in Sweden in 1958 and Brazil in South Korea-Japan in 2002. Good news for Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, Columbia, Mexico, the USA and the other teams from that part of the world.

Second, the winner is likely to be Brazil based on the fact that they have won more World Cups (5) than Italy (4) or Germany (3). Among Western Hemisphere powers Argentina and Uruguay have won two each. That Brazil is also the host country improves its odds, according to my soccer-mad friends, although it is important to remember they lost the final at home to Uruguay in 1950 — a result that made young Pelé’s father cry and inspired the later successful efforts.

Finally, the 2014 World Cup champion is likely to be a significant wine country. Every previous winner of the Cup from Uruguay in 1932 to Spain 2010 plays in the world wine league, even 1966 winner England, which makes up for its modest but growing current wine product by being a key export market for the world’s wine.  Is that too much of a stretch? I hope not — otherwise the Netherlands, another big export market,  might as well give up now!

Is Brazil an important wine country? If so, then it would seem to be the strongest possible favorite to win the cup, as a report from the analysts at Goldman Sachs suggests. Wine is alive and well in Brazil. No wonder they are using the occasion of the World Cup to promote their industry (click on the image above to see a FIFA video) much as South Africa did (see video below) when they hosted the 2010 tournament.

Brazil’s total wine output does not rival France, Italy and Spain, the globe’s top producers (and World Cup winners, too) but they are not at the bottom of the league table, either. Data for 2009 put Brazil’s wine production at 340 ML, less than Argentina (1214 ML) or Greece (425) but ahead of Austria (235 ML), New Zealand (205 ML), Uruguay (62 ML) and Croatia (75 ML).  Huge Brazil is not covered with vines, but it is clear that enough of it is to make it a significant wine producer.

My friends in Portugal and Argentina see Brazil as a significant export market, too, based on various combinations of language, history, culture and proximity that facilitate sales of their wine. And they are not alone is seeing Brazil’s potential. OIV data for 2013 put Brazil’s total wine consumption at 348 ML, above Chile but less than South Africa.

1532 and All That

While you might think of Brazil as a land of beaches and jungles, it is a very geographically diverse country with several major vineyard areas. The principal winegrowing region is the state of Rio Grande do Sul on the warm edge of the world wine-growing zone (roughly 30 – 50 degrees of latitude north and south). Serra Gaucha has more than 90,000 acres planted to vine.

Wine in Brazil goes way back. The Portuguese planted grapes around São Paulo in 1532 and Jesuit priests established vineyards in Rio Grande do Sul in 1626. But it took a wave of immigrants from Italy in the late 19th century to firmly plant the vine in Brazil.  The migrants came from Italy’s northeast – Trentino and the Veneto – and were drawn to the climate and hilly terrain of the Rio Grande do Sul. They brought winegrowing knowledge and a taste for the wines of their homeland, especially sparkling wines (think Spumante and Prosecco). Their influence persists today.

Champagne-maker Möet & Chandon saw Brazil’s potential, especially for sparklers,  as far back as 1973, when it was making its big globalization push into the U.S., Australia and Argentina. They invested in sparkling wine production in Brazil figuring that if anyone was going to sell domestic “Champagne” to fizz happy Brazilians it should be the Champenoise themselves. Möet & Chandon were soon joined by other wine/drinks multinationals including Seagrams, Bacardi, Heublein, Domecq and Martini & Rossi, so the international presence in Brazil is quite strong.

New World Order

Wine production 100 years ago was focused on quantity instead of quality, as it was in most of the world, and that meant American hybrid grapes rather than European-style vitis vinifera varietals because of climate concerns. Market problems led to the establishment of large cooperatives in the 1920s and 1930s, as growers, many with tiny vineyards, struggled for market power. As in Northern Italy, these cooperatives are still important today as the wine industry moves up the quality ladder.

One of these cooperatives grew so large that it became more or less the Riunite of Brazil. Cooperative Vitinicola Aurora was receiving grapes from more than 1500 family growers at its peak in the mid-1990s and producing (and exporting) very large quantities of wine.

team

Many Faces, One Heart

I haven’t tasted Faces, the official Brazilian wine of the 2014 World Cup, which is made by Lidio Carraro Boutique Winery, but I like its style. The wine brand picks up the twin themes of unity and diversity that are important to a sports team and so very important in Brazil’s history. Many Faces, One Heart — it is a fine message, don’t  you think?

The white wine is a blend of Chardonnay, Muscat and Riesling Italico, which should be a pleasant summer sipper. The red wine spares no effort to make the soccer connection — it is a blend of eleven different red grape varieties, one for each of the players on a soccer team.

Eleven players. Eleven grape varieties. In the same manner as the Brazilian national football team, the FACES wine label will represent Brazil as the OFFICIAL LICENSED WINE OF 2014 FIFA WORLD CUP™,  reflecting the national terroir with a team of grapes from different grape-growing regions, representing colors, aromas and flavors of our territory. Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Teroldego, Touriga Nacional, Tannat, Ancellotta, Nebbiolo, Tempranillo, Pinot Noir, Malbec and Alicante Bouschet are the selected grape varieties for the FACES red wine range. These varieties hail from every corner of the Serra Gaucha, including the Vale dos Vinhedos – the most traditional area for grape growing and wine-making in Brazil and also other locations in the Southern part of Rio Grande do Sul state.

If you scroll down on the Faces website you can find an interactive element that allows you to fill each position on the team from goalkeeper to striker with your choice of the appropriate grape variety. Apparently I am not a very good wine/soccer manager. I put Tannat in goal, but the winery says that Malbec is better there. But I did better with my choices at forward, according to the website.

Keep your eyes open for these wines and others from Brazil, which may be available more widely available during the World Cup. A quick internet search suggests that Faces wines have arrived in parts of Canada and the UK and probably here in the US, too. I’ll bet the Brazilians are hoping that you will toast their team’s victory with a glass of Brazilian wine! Cheers! (Or should I say Goooooooooooooool!?)

>>><<<

Some parts of this column appeared in my previous survey of wine in the BRIC nations. Here is the Goldman Sachs odds sheet for the World Cup as reported in the Wall Street Journal. GS calculates that Brazil has a 48.5 chance of winning its 6th World Cup.

 

The Wine World Comes to Walla Walla

OK, so The World — the whole world! — is not really coming to Walla Walla, the lively wine town in Southeast Washington State, but the city and AVA are hosting two events that promise to draw participants from far and wide. Sue and I will be attending both, so we thought we’d fill you in.

The World of Syrah

2014 is the Walla Walla AVA’s 30th birthday and they are marking the occasion with a three-day program called Celebrate Walla Walla Valley Wine: The World of Syrah on June 19-21, 2014. Click on the link for details.

Walla Walla Syrah will be explored through a series of tastings, talks and dinners.  The inclusion of winemakers from outside the region (including Gary Mills from Australia’s Jamsheed winery) gives the event a global flair, but it must be said that the Walla Walla industry is pretty globalized itself, with influences and investment from the world over.

The Long Shadows winery, for example, features famous partner/flying winemakers from around the world, each of whom makes one wine in a distinctive style from Washington grapes. Michel Rolland, John Duval and Armin Diel are among the international winemakers here.

Some of the best known resident names in Walla Walla wine are international, too, such as Giles Nicault, Jean-Françoise Pellet, Marie-Eve Gilla and Christophe Baron. Walla Walla in intensely local and extremely global at the same time — just what I like!

Sue and I are fortunate to be part of a media group that will go behind he scenes to visit the vineyards, meet the wine people and get to know both the region’s Syrahs and its other wines as well. We are looking forward to the experience.

Wine Economists in Walla Walla

The American Association of Wine Economists will be in town June 22-25 for their annual meetings and we are looking forward to a lot of interesting papers and presentations. I expect to greet fellow wine economists from every continent except Antarctica at the meetings!

Click here to download the conference program, which includes dozens of presentations, a lecture on the region’s terroirs by geologist Kevin Pogue, a panel discussion of U.S. wine market regulation and a festive dinner at the Long Shadows winery.

The World of Syrah and the wine economists back-to-back meetings looks like a great opportunity for me to catch up with the wine’s global-local dynamic and for the world to take a closer look at this dynamic region. Look for future columns about what I learn.

Sniff, Swirl & Soak? Hanoi’s Healthful Red Wine Baths

bath2It seems like the news is full of reports about the health effects of wine consumption and, given the impact that 60 Minutes’s broadcast of “The French Paradox” segment (see below) had back in 1991, I think we need to take them seriously, both from a pure health standpoint and because of their possible economic impacts.

Heart Disease, Tooth Decay

There have been a number of recent studies that seem to contradict the finding that red wine consumption has clear health benefits — bad news for wine drinkers.

But then a Spanish-Swiss team found that red wine discourages tooth decay, which pushes the need back toward the plus side for wine.

And now this. Ali Hoover, The Wine Economist’s chief Hanoi correspondent, has discovered that wine is not just good for you when you drink it, it is even beneficial when you just sit in a tub of it.

Clinical Trials?

Or at least that’s the claim made by this Vietnamese spa, which features a red wine bath treatment along with its other services. Ali has not tried the wine bath yet, but I suppose it is just a matter of time before she takes the plunge. Check out the list of health benefits she found on the spa’s menu. Fight cancer, stroke, diabetes and high cholesterol and get long life and beautiful skin in the process. Who could resist and the price is right at about $20 for an hour’s soak.

Ali verified that the wine is the local Vang Dalat, which I suppose adds to the authenticity of the experience.  No tasting notes so far, or sitting notes either. I have tried the Vang Dalat white wine, but I only drank it and didn’t sit in it. No experience with the red wine at all. I’m not sure if all the health claims are supported by scientific evidence. Early days in this important research. We’ll keep you informed! Who knows — could be the next big thing!

bath1>>><<<

Special thanks to Ali for this discovery. Readers: please comment with details if  you’ve taken a wine bath!

Enthralled by Wine Wars! Jerry Lockspeiser’s Review

I was surprised to discover a nice review of my books Wine Wars and Extreme Wine penned by Jerry Lockspeiser when I checked the Harpers.co.uk website this morning.

The column is titled “Jerry Lockeiser is enthralled by the wine business insights of Mike Veseth.” Wow!

Thanks to Jerry for his kind words and gentle critique. Click on the link above to read the review.

 

Mostosa the Debt-Slayer: Exploring the Native Wine Grapes of Italy

Ian D’Agata, Native Wine Grapes of Italy. University of California Press, 2014.

I really didn’t think there was much left to be said about wine grape varieties after Jancis Robinson and her team published Wine Grapes, their magisterial analysis of 1365 different grape varieties. (There’s a nifty Kindle version of this 2012 volume available now for you e-Book fans.)

Been There, Done That?

So I was skeptical when this big book arrived in the mail — it looked like a lot of pages and text given that the subject is just one country, even one as viticulturally complicated as Italy. Was there really enough new and interesting to justify adding a volume like this to my already-groaning wine bookshelf.

Well, I am pleased to say that I was wrong to be such a skeptic and that I find Ian D’Agata’s just released book to be detailed, interesting and original and I recommend to anyone interested in Italian wines or the topic of native wine grapes generally. It is a seriously fascinating read.

The book begins with two chapters that set the stage then drills down through the layers  starting with major grape groups and families (familiar names to most of us), moving on to major native and traditional grape varieties (less familiar names here), “little known” (not lesser or minor) grape varieties, and then by a brief chapter on “crossings.”

Italy Beyond the Usual Suspects

Suspicious of how much there might be to learn, I started with three grape varieties that I know pretty well and have written about, Pignoletto from Emilia-Romanga, Lacrima from Marche and Piedmont’s Ruché. Reading through the entries was a humbling experience because there was so much more to know about these grapes and the wines produced from them than I ever imagined.

The grape variety entries are detailed and very personal, which makes them a pleasure to read, with notes about specific producers and occasional specific wine recommendation. The notes on the major grape varieties such as Sangiovese and Nebbiolo are particularly detailed and informative, as you would expect, but what about the less-known grapes?

Well, there are dozens of them analyzed here, so I decided to try to narrow the focus be reading only the entries for grapes from Emilia-Romagna —  I am somewhat less ignorant of this region than other parts of Italy because I lived for a time in Bologna when I taught at the Johns Hopkins center there.

Mostosa the Debt-Slayer

The list of little known grapes from this area was still very long and in some cases just a few rows of vines remained.  D’Agata treats each carefully and occasionally pleads for someone to step in and save a promising grape variety from extinction. Obviously one purpose of the book is to raise awareness of these grapes and the wines made from them and to support those who seek to preserve them.

My favorite “lesser known” grape variety? It has to be Mostosa, so named it is said because of the large quantities of must (mosto) that it produces and the large quantities of wine that result. A productive grape, you might say, and perhaps for that reason is sometimes associated with a wine known as Pagadebit (debt-payer).  Fine wine or Chateau Cash Flow? I’ve gotta get back to Bologna to find out.

D’Agata’s book caught me by surprise and has earned a place on this skeptic’s wine book wall. I can’t wait to take it with me to Italy and let it guide me to some fascinating new experiences.

>>><<<

If you find this interesting you might want to check out De Long’s Wine Map of Italy – beautiful and informative.

Here’s That Rainy Day: Wine Touring in Porto

I had one free day during my recent visit to Porto and as much as I wanted to go up the Douro to the vineyards, a  torrential downpour kept me in the city. So I set out to see what sort of wine tourism experience Porto had to offer and I learned a lot. Here is my report.

Sign of The Don

There is much to see and do in Porto itself, but serious wine tourists need to cross the bridge spanning the Douro and enter Vila Nova de Gaia where the Port houses are found lined up along the river and up the hillside.

The riverside was brightly decorated — a welcome touch given the weather — and featured many of  the small boats that traditionally transported the wines from the vineyard areas down to the city, where they are aged and blended and sent to market. The wines are moved by more modern means today, although there is still a gala race, with much honor to the Port house with the winning boat.

My first stop was Quinta do Noval, where I took refuge from the rain and tasted through the wines while drying out. I have to say that there cannot be a better way to warm up than this! No tour or museum or sophistical wine tourist presentation at this stop — just nice wines, friendly and well-informed staff.

My next stop was Sandeman, one of the oldest and best known Port houses.  You see “The Don,” the famous Sandeman logo, everywhere in Porto. Founded in 1790 by George Sandeman, a Scottish wine merchant, Sandeman has interests both in Portugal (Port) and Spain (Sherry). The Don’s distinctive outfit pays tribute to both sides of the business — the Spanish hat paired with the cape worn by university students then and  now in Porto (I saw them myself on exam day). If you thought the logo was a tribute to Zoro, think again.

Tree Ages of Port

The wine tourism experience at Sandeman begins as you enter the house, which feels and smells exactly like what it is — a great old warehouse where wines wait patiently in their barrels, often for decades, for the moment when they will be bottled and go to market. Very atmospheric, immediately communicating a sense of time and place (much like the vintage tv advertisement below).

The first stop once you’ve come through the great doors is a colorful museum dedicated to Sandeman’s great success in branding and marketing. The Don must be one of the most distinctive and instantly recognizable trademarks in wine and the museum tells the icon’s story from the first images in 1928 through the present day. It’s an art exhibit at heart, but with a commercial agenda and it is interesting to see how the images and messages evolved over the years.

Next came the tour through the big building. The young woman who guided us was dressed as The Don, of course, but she was more professor than student as she made sure, though example and strategic repetition, that we all understood the nature of the different types of Port — Vintage, LBV, Tawny and so on — how they are made and how they are best consumed. She was very skilled at bringing her students into the story.

Wine Tourism Keys

Walking through the barrel rooms was like walking back in history (which is what we were doing, I suppose), but this is a working operation not a museum and we would have seen the cellar hands going about their business if it hadn’t been Sunday. The tour ended with an opportunity to taste a couple of wines at long tables adjacent to the cellar door sales room and gift shop.

I spent some time talking with a family from Tokyo who were making a European tour and had spent three days in Porto, enjoying experiences like this. Each of the Port houses seems to tell its story in a different way, some focusing on their history, others on the production process. Many, like Sandeman and Graham’s, offer a variety of tasting experiences in addition to the basic tour. Port pairing seminars (cheese, chocolate) are popular, for example, as well as opportunities to taste Tawny Port blends of 10, 20 and 40 years or more. Something for everyone and a satisfying experience even on a sunny day, I’ll bet.

What should a wine tourism experience do? I think of wine as a relationship business and a winery or tasting room visit succeeds when it helps establish new relationships and deepen or renews existing ones. From the tourists’ point of view, it should be enjoyable and informative — and of course offer the opportunity to taste new wines or to share familiar ones with traveling companions and provide stories to tell the folks back home.

From a producer viewpoint, the goals are to get visitors to slow down and absorb the message and this of course requires that there actually be a coherent message presented (too often it seems the objective is simply to attract numbers of visitors). Cellar door sales and wine club memberships are obviously important, too, but only come if the first goals are met.

The Sandeman experience and others like it in Porto succeed from both standpoints. Certainly there was clear and coherent messaging on my tour — about both Port the category, Ports (the various types of Port wines) and the Sandeman brand in particular. (How can you miss that when your tour guide is costumed like the company logo?) When it works it really works. No wonder the major Port houses have invested so much in wine tourism as a way develop their international brands.

Little Frenchie: A Culinary Side-Trip

Soon it was lunchtime and I could not really expect to top the meal I had the day before at Vinum, the great restaurant up the hill at Graham’s, so instead I went for the distinctive meal of Porto: the Francesinha or “Little Frenchie” sandwich.

My Francesinha started with thin layers of cheese on the plate, which was topped with white bread and then roast pork, sliced ham, a bit of chorizo, more cheese, another slice of bread, more cheese, and then a thin reddish beer-based sauce (think enchilada sauce and you will be in the ballpark).

Because I apparently am  not a very good judge of these things, I went over the top and ordered the deluxe version which added a fried egg and a plate of french fries. It was wonderful in the way that Canada’s famous poutaine (french fries, cheese curd, gravy) can be wonderful and I didn’t have room for anything else (except a little Port) for the rest of the day.

I had a great time, learned a lot, met some interesting people. I promise I will get to the Douro vineyards next time, but I wouldn’t miss touring the Port houses for anything.  The variety of experiences available if you visit several houses provides something for everyone, from Port novice to seasoned connoisseur.

>>><<<

Thanks to George Sandeman for his hospitality while I was in Porto and his help with this project. I found this YouTube video that captures a bit of the Francesinha experience. Would I eat it again? Yes, but I’d choose the traditional beer to go with it rather than the red wine I enjoyed at my riverfront restaurant, which claimed to have the best Franceshina in town.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,913 other followers