Einstein’s Law & Washington Wine

einsteinEinstein said that everything should be made as simple as possible … but not simpler. At some point further simplification loses the essence of whatever is being studied. I am pretty sure that he was talking about physics, not wine, but I think the concept applies here as well.

I was reminded of Einstein’s Law when I learned about what the Auction of Washington Wines is doing to try to spread the word about this region’s dynamic wine scene. Usually the auction is an in-person event and so the impact is limited a bit by attendance constraints. This year, however, they’ve gone virtual, which opens up expanded possibilities. And they’ve partnered with the world-class story-teller, Karen MacNeil, to spread the word, simplify the story, but not too much.

The Signature Grape Syndrome

The temptation to violate Einstein’s law is strong. Wine people look at the success of New Zealand and Argentina,. for example,  and decide that a single signature grape is the answer. I have argued that a signature variety is no silver bullet and, in any case, what grape variety would Washington choose? Riesling makes sense. Chateau Ste Michelle is the world’s largest producer of Riesling wines. Merlot had proponents for a while (pre-Sideways).

Cabernet Sauvignon was the recent favorite, but too much was planted both in Washington and parts of California, and it is not the easy sell it once was.  And there are lots of other contenders including Syrah, Grenache, Cabernet Franc, and rising Tempranillo. No one grape variety rules them all … or should.

waWashington’s wine diversity is a blessing for consumers, but a problem for marketers. No wonder the Washington State Wine Commission went to the other extreme in choosing a new logo. Some of my wine friends admire the austere graphics, but I think it simplifies too far.  What story does it tell? Einstein would not approve, although I am not sure what alternative he’d suggest. He’d probably just pour another glass of great Washington wine and leave it at that.

Happily the new logo is part of a useful package of resources to help wineries tell their (and Washngton’s) story. And I don’t think anyone will mistake WA wine for the logo of Wawa, the Pennsylvania-based gasoline and convenience store chain.

Washington Wine Storybook

Karen MacNeil and the Auction of Washington Wines have to simplify, too, but virtual platforms allow more depth and detail.  They’ve organized a series of on-line interviews and tastings, each with a particular theme.  Wines for each session are available for purchase.

wawine

A webinar on Washington wine “trailblazers” (originally web-cast on June 18  but you can still watch the video) brought together pioneers Allen Shoup, Rick Small, and Marty Clubb. Shoup, Small, and Clubb have seen the Washington industry grow from just a hand full of wineries to over 1000 producers. MacNeil begins the conversation by asking, did you always know this was going to be a success? Good question. Click on the image to hear their answers.

The second webinar, which first appeared on July 2, focuses on the next generation, giving a sense of the dynamic of this young industry. Andrew Januik, Rob Mercer, John Bookwalter, and Caleb Foster are featured.

Next up (on July 16, so you still have time to place your wine order) is a program on women in Washington wine featuring Leah Adint, Lisa Packer, and Jessica Munnell. The status of women in the wine industry is one of Karen MacNeil’s particular concerns, so this session is an opportunity to add this important issue to the mix. Hopefully future programs can explore issues of diversity and inclusion in even greater depth and breadth.

Three Ps: It’s Complicated

Other programs in the series will explore the topics of terroir (Red Mountain) and grape varieties. There’s no way they can tell the whole story of Washington wine any more than the previous sessions could, but they aren’t likely to violate Einstein’s Law, either.

Sometimes complicated things need to be understood in complicated ways, so there is plenty of room for future webinars to examine the great diversity of Washington’s “Three Ps,” the people and their distinctive visions, the places (the varied terroir), and the plants (the grape varieties that thrive here).

2 responses

  1. The number of cultivars is always behind by at least ten!

    I’m not a fan of the CSM latitude marketing, it not just latitude. Mongolian wine? I mean really we can’t get Bordeaux wineries to come for comparative tastings anymore.

    I think we are best represented by a rainbow, an infinite variation of colors and types. I don’t make white wine, mine are hues of straw and gold. I don’t make red wine, mine are ruby, and then there is our Rosé Paradiso, it’s salmon.

    I have a tiny vineyard, 15.2 Km. of cordon wire, but it’s 15 cultivars, including the USA’s only Xarel•lo.

    Diversity is our thing!

    Paul Vandenberg
    Paradisos del Sol Winery and Organic Vineyard

  2. California wines are nearly all too sweet. There’s your niche. Washington’s shorter growing season should allow you to produce nice, dry wines, just don’t add the bag of C&H sugar or the mega purple.

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