Războaiele Vinului: Romanian Wine Wars


Romania has a long wine history and a more significant contemporary wine market presence than many observers appreciate. Its fine wines seem to fly under the radar here in the United States.

Romania produces more wine than New Zealand, according to OIV statistics. So why are Kiwi wines much  better known on the international scene?

Strategy is one answer. New Zealand is highly export-driven, powered by international and multinational investment, while Romanians drink much more of their own wine and export less. In fact, statistics I found suggest that Romanian spending on imports generally exceeds their wine export receipts, creating a negative wine trade balance.

Market positioning is another difference. When New Zealand was breaking into the high-margin US and UK markets 20 years ago many Romanian producers were focused on the lower-margin Russian and CIS markets. This is changing. Exports to the UK, China, and Germany among others now lead the charge. Romanian wine is on the rise.

I was pleased, therefore, to learn that a Romanian translation of my 2011 book Wine Wars has been released. It is called Războaiele Vinului, which translates as “War of Wine.”  The subtitle, “The Curse of the Blue Nun, the Miracle of Two Buck Chuck and the Revenge of the Terroirists” is “Blestemul Blue Nun, Miracolul Two Buck Chuck și Razboaiele Teroriștilor” in Romanian.

The Romanian Wine Wars was adapted by Catalin Paduraru and translated by Radu Rizea. Why translate Wine Wars into Romanian? Catalin believes that it is important for Romanian wine producers to better understand the global markets in which they and their wines compete. He sees Wine Wars as an approachable and understandable analysis of global wine dynamics and was willing to go to a good deal of trouble to make it available in Romania. I’m flattered by this attention and hope that Romanian wine-makers can leverage this analysis to help them gain ground in the fiercely competitive global markets.

I hope to find an opportunity to visit Romania later this year and talk about their wine wars with my Romanian readers. Cheers to you all, and especially to Catalin for all the work he put into this project.


Book Review: Intriguing Variations on a Wine Globalization Theme

9781107192928Wine Globalization: A New Comparative History edited by Kym Anderson and Vicente Pinilla, Cambridge University Press, 2018. (See also The World’s Wine Markets: Globalization at Work edited by Kym Anderson, Edward Elgar, 2004.)

The fact that wine is such a global business was one of factors that motivated me to study it seriously in the first place. My 2005 book Globaloney (named a Best Business Book of that year by Library Journal) included a chapter that examined the evolution of global wine markets and that got me hooked.

Globalization’s Terroir

Globaloney was a heart a series of case studies that together argued that  globalization is not an  unstoppable tsunami that sweeps away all before it, but rather a complex set of forces that play out differently in different industries. Fast food globalization, for example, is different from slow food globalization. And while high fashion and used clothing are both traded in global markets and acted upon by some of the same general forces, their specific patterns and impacts are very different.

Globalization reflects its terroir, I used to tell audiences at book talks, and the volume that Kym Anderson, Vincente Pinilla, and their talented team of authors have assembled take this idea one step further. The core of the book is a collection of historical case studies of how national wine industries have developed in both the old and new wine worlds in the context of global markets.

Two things struck me as I read the studies. First, I was excited by how detailed and interesting this research is. Fascinating. Irresistible. I couldn’t wait to turn the page to read more.

The second striking feature was how much wine globalization really does reflect its terroir. Although there are some common themes (the impact of phylloxera and the Great Depression, for example), the fact is that wine has developed and evolved in distinctly different ways in different parts of the wine world. Globalization has been an important factor in many cases, but not in the same way everywhere.

Argentina’s Unique History

Let me use the excellent chapter on Argentina by Steve Stein and Ana Maria Mateu as an example. Argentina’s wine history has been shaped by a series of strong internal and external forces. Let’s start with the grapes. Spanish missionaries from the Canary Islands brought high-yielding low-quality Criolla grapes with them and this set the tone for wine-making and drinking for much of the country’s history.

French wine authority Michel Aimé Pouget was lured away from his work in Chile to improve wine quality and he brought higher quality grapevines, including especially Malbec. Alas, the authors tell us, Malbec was frequently valued less for the quality of its wines than the fact that they were dark and strong and could therefore successfully be diluted with water without completely losing their identity as wine. Low standards like this defined the domestic market for decades.

British influence, in the form of the railroads that they financed and helped to build, had a profound impact on Argentina wine. Prior to the railroads that connected Mendoza and San Juan with bustling Buenos Aires, the domestic wine industry was quite small.

Mendoza and environs made wine for local consumption. Buenos Aires residents (more and more of them immigrants from Spain and Italy) filled their glasses with imported wine. Lower land transportation costs changed everything  when the train line was completed, expanding the internal market and fostering a wine boom.

Anticipating the impact of the railroads, Mendoza officials sent recruiters to Europe to bring back experienced Spanish and Italian wine-growers and wine-makers who expanded the industry. With phylloxera spreading at home and hard times all around, the difficult decision to uproot and replant families and businesses to immigrant-hungry Argentina was easy to  make.

Peso Problems

The list of international and global forces and effects in Argentina is a long one and I  only scratch the surface here. In recent decades, for example, the government’s strong-peso policy of the 1990s (the peso was linked to the U.S. dollar) made imports of wine-making equipment and technology artificially cheap and wineries were quickly upgraded. The collapse of this monetary system and the peso crisis that followed made the output of those wineries artificially cheap to foreign buyers, a factor in the country’s wine export boom.

Rapid domestic inflation combined with an unyielding exchange rate earlier this decade made the peso over-valued again and the wine export boom fizzled. Policies are changing now. Perhaps the export boom will return, albeit in a different form. Too soon to tell at this point.

Argentina’s wine history and its experience with international and global forces is fascinating and other chapters in the book are equally interesting. Wine’s story is a complicated one, with each nation developing and responding in a different way depending on many factors including history, culture, institutional structure, timing, and government policy.

This book is a great resource for anyone interested in understanding the wine world today and how we got here. The volume concludes with “Projecting Global Wine Markets to 2025” by Kym Anderson and his colleague Glyn Wittwer, a set of forecasts and analyses based upon their econometric model of global wine markets.

Economists Know the Price of Everything …

Wine Globalization has many strengths that recommend it to a broad readership and one obvious weakness that will discourage some who would otherwise benefit from studying it: the price. If you are not familiar with the academic book market, the price of this volume will take your breath away: $139.50 for the hardback and $124 for the Kindle on Amazon.com.

This is how books are often priced by academic publishers, who need to spread high fixed costs over small expected press runs.  If you have a son or daughter in college (or are in college yourself), you already know what textbooks cost these days. Incredible.

But all the news about price is not so discouraging. Kym Anderson and his colleagues at the Wine Economics Research Center at the University of Adelaide provide an enormous array of useful and interesting global wine market data (some of which informs the Wine Globalization volume) for the attractive price of … free. Free!  Here are some of the data sets you might want to explore. (You can find even more data here.)

Anderson, K., S. Nelgen and V. Pinilla, Database of Global Wine Markets: A Statistical Compendium, 1860 to 2016 (November 2017)

Anderson, K., S. Nelgen and V. Pinilla (with the assistance of A.J. Holmes), Annual Database of Global Wine Markets, 1835 to 2016 (November 2017)

Holmes, A.J. and K. Anderson (2017). Annual Database of National Beverage Consumption Volumes and Expenditures, 1950 to 2015 (July 2017)

Wine Globalization is a valuable contribution to our understanding of world wine markets. Highly recommended. And that’s not globaloney!

Book Review: James Conaway on the Napa Valley Wine Wars

napaJames Conaway, Napa at Last Light: America’s Eden in an Age of Calamity (Simon & Schuster, March 2018).

Hegel wrote that the Owl of Minerva only takes flight at dusk, suggesting that wisdom (the owl) finally awakes when the day is nearly done and the opportunity to benefit from insight has almost passed. It is a sad thought — I hope that Hegel is wrong — but it captures pretty well the gist of this new book by James Conaway, who has been writing about the Napa Valley for many years.

Conaway’s new book presents a series of vignettes and profiles that collective capture the ongoing wine war in the Napa Valley. Conaway is not a neutral observer in this battle, so this is a tale of white hats and black hats.

The White Hats include Andy Beckstoffer, Volker Eislele, and Randy Dunn, leaders in movements to preserve Napa’s farming and environmental heritage. The Black Hats include Mike Davis, Jean Charles Boisset, and especially Kathryn and Craig Hall, who have told their side of the wine wars story in their book A Perfect Score.

Reading Conaway’s book about what’s wrong with the Napa Valley made me sad because it reminds me about something that is wrong with society today. The Napa Valley of Conaway’s book is full of people with their backs to the wall, angry, suspicious, and unwilling to bend or compromise. Reminds me of any number of issues in society today (guns and immigration, for example).

There doesn’t seem be much room for meaningful dialogue. Sometimes it seems like there isn’t even a common language, much less common values or goals. Gridlock prevails: movement is slowed or stifled, but threats remain.

Only at the very end of the book — dusk, I suppose, or last light — does Conaway give a sense that there might be some coming together, working together. Hope it is not too late. But recent news is not encouraging.

Pressures continue to grow. Last week, for example, the Napa Country Board of Supervisors voted to put an initiative on the June ballot that would shut off development in certain areas. Pro and con forces seem to be prepared for a serious fight over the future. Meanwhile an interview with James Conaway suggests that he’s given up hope. Too little, too late.

I learned a lot about the Napa Valley,  wine wars, and the White Hat and Black Hat combatants from this book, but I admit to being disappointed. Conaway takes a strong stand with his White Hat friends and his anger and outrage come through clearly. But I wonder what the conflict looks like from the perspective those who are in the middle, trying to balance interests and reconcile development and environment before the last light is gone?  That’s a book that I would like to read.

Not that there aren’t glimpses here of what a working consensus might look like. I was especially intrigued by the sixteenth chapter, which gives an account of how John Williams of Frogs Leap Winery led a successful movement to restore a stretch of the Napa River. Water, Conaway suggests, is at the root of all conflict in Napa. Rivers both divide and unite. The Williams story shows that it is at least sometimes possible to find common ground.

Building that common ground where shared values are developed and real progress can be made is important both for Napa and for society in general. Having started with Hegel’s owl, I conclude with William Butler Yeats’ falcon, from “The Second Coming.”

   Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world …

Beyond Wine Boom & Bust: Taking a Closer Look at the SVB Report

svb-2018wine-thumbSilicon Valley Bank recently released their 2018 State of the Industry report on the U.S. wine market and if you haven’t read it you should. It is well researched, written, and argued. Most important, it will challenge your ideas about the U.S. wine industry and make you think.

Most of the media reaction to the report has focused on two “boom and bust” elements: the predictions that (1) the 20-year wine market expansion is coming to an end and (2) that the relentless rise in grape prices and vineyard valuations in Napa Valley will pause or plateau.

Both of these predictions are significant although, as the report notes, calling a “turn” in the market is inherently problematic and will be difficult to assess until a few years down the road. In the short term, for example, the report notes that the U.S. wine market should continue to grow in 2018, although at a slower pace. Value will grow faster than volume due to the “two track” U.S. market with growth in premium wine sales offsetting declining lower-shelf demand.

This Changes Everything?

Boom and bust make headlines, but there are two important points that the SVB report makes that I think should get more attention. The first is the fact that we are witnessing fundamental changes in the retail market environment. Not just retail wine market, retail everything (or just about). Who buys, when, where, and how, who consumes, when, where, why, and how. Even the way people pay is changing.  Amazon is one driving force in this environmental transformation, but only part of it.

This fact was driven home to me a few weeks ago when I read that the Swiss luxury group Richemont (controlled by South Africa’s Rupert family), announced plans to buy out Yoox Net-a-Porter,  an Italy-based  luxury “etailer.” Richemont’s brands include Cartier, Van Cleef & Arpels, Piaget, Vacheron Constantin, Jaeger-LeCoultre, IWC Schaffhausen, Panerai and Montblanc. High end stuff.

You might think that consumers would be willing to buy books and t-shirts online but that they would hesitate to throw down $5000 or more for jewelry or a watch without holding it in their hands. But you would be wrong, or so the Richemont folks believe. The idea kind of takes my breath away.

It’s a new world for wine as for other things, the SVB report suggests. And the patterns and practices that were successful in years gone by, including but not limited to bricks-and-mortar versus online sales, are not guaranteed to work in the future. Time to question and rethink.


Talking ‘Bout the Generations

A second interesting but possibly under-appreciated point that the SVB report raises concerns generational analysis of the wine market. Most of what you read about wine today frames the changing market demographics in terms of baby boomers versus millennials. But, as this figure from Statista.com suggests, there is a “missing middle” to this analysis. The figure shows 2016 median household income by age of householder.

Lost in the focus on rising younger, poorer millennials versus declining older, richer boomers is the Gen-X generation who are in their 40s now (more or less) and reaching their peak earning (and consuming) years. They are, SVB argues, an important but sometimes underappreciated market for wine. And, as a recent Wine Access study reveals, although Gen-X is a smaller cohort than boomers or millennials, they are willing and able to spend proportionately more on wine.

I think these are very useful insights, although I’m always a bit cautious regarding generational analysis. My years as a university professor taught me that the differences between generations are sometimes less important than diversity within them. Sometimes it is appropriate to generalize about a generation, but not always.

Take boomers, for example. The conventional wisdom is that baby boomers have driven the wine market growth — and this is true — but remember that most boomers don’t drink wine regularly and many don’t drink it (or any alcohol) at all.

The boomer wine boom is driven by a relatively small segment of this generational group. In a way, the boomer wine phenomenon is about a subgroup that is at least somewhat atypical of its cohort — and that difference is key.

The SVB report goes well beyond boom and bust to include these significant insights and many others, too. Highly recommended for anyone who wants to understand the American wine industry today and where it is headed.


Congratulations to Rob McMillan and his team for a thought-provoking report.

David Ricardo to Donald Trump: Global Wine Trade and Its Discontents

5788597-mWhen David Ricardo wanted to make the logic of his famous Theory of Comparative Advantage crystal clear he knew what example to choose: wine. It was obvious that Britain should import wine from Portugal in exchange for cloth rather than trying for vinous self-sufficiency. Any fool could see that!

Make Great Britain Great?

But wine wasn’t really the point of his example. He was more concerned about the Corn Laws, a set of trade barriers designed to choke off agricultural imports and promote higher prices for domestic grain (lining the pockets of rural landowners in the process). If Britain should trade cloth for wine, then why not trade cloth for wheat and other grains as well?

The wine story was good enough to convince Ricardo’s economist colleagues, but not so much those in parliament. The Corn Laws lasted from 1815 until 1846. Economic logic triumphed over vested interests in the long run, but the human cost of the trade barriers to urban workers and their families in terms of higher food costs and lower living standards was very high.

Britain really didn’t fulfill the promise of its Industrial Revolution until the Corn Laws were repealed. It is fair to speculate that Parliament could have acted to Make Great Britain Great much sooner if they had been guided by the economic logic of wine trade.

Wine is perhaps a good guide to British political economy today, too. Brexit, which was promoted as a way to Make Great Britain Great Again, seems to have instead made British families poorer even though the change in trade policies has not yet been enacted or even agreed.  Rising import prices and stagnant wages have squeezed consumer budgets for wine as for many other items (sound familiar?). Tesco, the upscale supermarket giant, is reportedly planning a discount chain of its own to compete with increasingly popular “hard discount” Aldi and Lidl stores.

Make American Wine Even Greater?

The wine trade has lessons for the United States, too. Or at least that was my takeaway from two speakers at the “State of the Industry” session at the recent Washington Winegrowers Convention and Trade Show. 

Glenn Proctor of The Ciatti Company presented a very interesting survey of global wine market conditions. There are only two big wine markets that are growing in terms of total consumption, Proctor said: China and the United States. The Chinese market is particularly attractive because of the large rising middle class and potential for further growth.  French wines are top of the import table in China, followed by Australia and Chile — two countries that have benefited from free trade agreements with China.

Indeed, China is now the #1 export market for Australian wine, accounting for 33 per cent of exports, ahead of the US (18%), UK (14%), Canada (7%), and Hong Kong (5%). The Chinese market has powered Australia’s resurgence as a global wine power and the free trade agreement is an important part of the story.

The United States? Well, the U.S. has no free trade agreement with China and President Trump pulled the U.S. out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations — which could have opened up Asian markets — on his first day in office. Partly as a result, I suppose, the U.S. ranks #6 on the China import list. Australia wine sales volumes are more than ten times the U.S. amount.

If recent import trends continue for a couple of years, U.S. sales to China may be surpassed by relatively tiny Georgia. Georgian wine sales to China have surged (up 45%) in part because of the Georgia-China free trade structure that went into effect at the beginning of the year. The U.S. wine industry is clearly handicapped in foreign markets where other producers have preferential access.

John Aguirre, President of the California Association of Winegrape Growers, also highlighted  the importance of trade agreements for the wine industry. President Trump has raised doubts about  U.S. – Korea free trade (the Korean market has lots of potential for U.S. wine) and launched negotiations to revise NAFTA. Since Canada is the largest export market for U.S. wines, it is essential that NAFTA maintain open cross-border access.

The wine industry would suffer if the NAFTA negotiation somehow collapse, although the negative impacts would obviously be less than agriculture generally and the automotive industry, both of which have become dependent on efficient trans-border industrial integration in order to compete with efficient producers in other parts of the world.

I am hopeful that the NAFTA negotiations will be successful at updating the treaty since there is so much at stake. But my confidence is shaken somewhat by President Trump’s actions to block new appointments to the World Trade Organization’s appeals body — the entity charged with enforcing the rules of the trade game.  This will make it more difficult for the U.S. wine industry to pursue its complaint against the British Columbia wine regulators concerning their discriminatory supermarket wine sales policy, which favors B.C. wines relative to imports in clear violation, in my view, of the WTO’s non-discrimination principle.

What’s the bottom line? If President Trump: wants to Make American Wine Even Greater, he might take a lesson from David Ricardo and re-think administration actions and policies regarding global trade agreements.

Wine Business 101: Exploring America’s Largest Wine Industry Trade Show

unifiedContributing editor Sue Veseth is fascinated by wine industry trade shows. She recently attended the Unified Wine & Grape Symposium trade show in Sacramento, California. Here is her report.


Making wine is not very stuff-intensive, right? Some grapes, a vessel for fermentation, maybe a couple of barrels, some bottles or jugs, closures — voilà!

But modern winemaking, even for small wineries and those making natural wines, can be very stuff-intensive. A good place to start looking at or shopping for all of the stuff for winemaking is the trade show at the Unified Wine & Grape Symposium in Sacramento, California. This is the largest trade show in North America for the wine and grape industry, attracting more than 600 vendors from around the world and more than 14,000 visitors. A lot of people in the industry use the trade show to connect with friends, colleagues, suppliers, and peers in the industry, in addition to shopping.

Some trade shows are focused on particular aspects of the industry. The SIMEI show we attended in Milan, Italy, in 2015, was all about machinery and technology. Smaller regional trade shows may combine winemaking and other agriculture industries. The January 2018 VinCO trade show in Grand Junction, Colorado, was about winemaking and fruit-based agriculture.


In contrast, the Unified is a soup-to-nuts trade show: tractors, plants, fertilizers, trellises, bottling lines, hoses and fittings, flooring, waste and wastewater management, vessels and containers of all types and sizes, construction services, irrigation systems, cleaning equipment, chemicals, testing services, software to manage just about everything, bottles, closures, labels, packaging, marketing materials, financial services, transportation, industry publications — and the list goes on. Some vendors have been in the show for years; a few new vendors show up every year. Some vendors may wait several years before scoring a spot.

It seemed to me that the people staffing the booths this year were spending more time talking to customers and passers-by than staring at their cell phones — hooray! Conversely, fewer exhibitors this year insisted on scanning my visitor badge, probably easily realizing that I was looking not buying.

One vendor in particular especially impressed me. This vendor had a dozen staff members, including high-level executives, in a standard-sized, attractive-but-not-flashy booth. But few were actually in the booth. They were always working the floor, with both intense and casual conversations with customers and potential customers. You could tell that this vendor was focused on business.

The raptors are always one of the most popular exhibits. The falcons are used for pest control. It is easy to anthropomorphize and conclude that the birds’ beady stares may be sizing us up — perhaps as lunch?

I also enjoyed looking at the pruning equipment and vineyard supplies that could be useful to the home gardener.

Vegan Fertilizer?

So, is there anything new? Yes, to me anyway. Especially intriguing were two French vendors with vegan products and processes for winemaking. One was showing vegan fertilizer. I had hoped to bring home a sample to try, but the smell was very strong, very fertilizer-y, even packed in multiple layers of plastic zip bags. Alas, it did not make it into the suitcase. Another company offers a range of products for vegan winemaking.

I was not aware of vegan winemaking, but it turns out that many wines I know and enjoy are vegan, at least based on the Barnivore list (http://www.barnivore.com/), although they are not necessarily promoted as vegan. Another “who knew?” moment.

Costs and Benefits

The question always arises: Is it worth it? There were moments when the trade show was jammed (after the State of the Industry presentations, during lunch, and during the regional wine tasting, for example) and other times when the aisles were open and easy to navigate (such as the afternoon of the second and final day of the show). The busy times seemed as busy as in past years but the slow times seemed slower to me this year.

Participating in the show is not inexpensive, for both the vendors and those attending. A lot of people were looking, but how many were buying? Does the activity level reflect expectations about expansions, contractions, or no change at individual wineries and the industry in general? Is it an opportunity to see and be seen?

The answers probably depend on who you are, what you are selling, and what you are buying. But if you want to understand the scope of the wine industry, the Unified Wine & Grape Symposium trade show is a good place to start.


New York Times wine critic Eric Asimov attend the Unified trade show for the first time in 2017. You might be interested in his reflections on the experience. Spoiler alert — he was also fascinated by falcon pest control.


Many thanks to everyone who works to make the Unified Symposium and its trade show a success. Special thanks to John Aguirre and Jenny Devine and to photographer Ken Freeze for providing the image above.


Wine Tourism Grows Up: A Visit to Washington’s Chateau Ste Michelle

chateau-ste-michelleI am in Kennewick, Washington today and tomorrow to speak at the Washington Winegrowers Association 2018 Convention & Trade Show.  Tomorrow I’ll share some thoughts about wine premiumization in the “State of the Industry” session, but today’s focus is wine tourism. I’ll give a global perspective on wine tourism as part of a program on  “The Business Side of Your Tasting Room.”

Grape Expectations?

Increasingly the tasting room’s business is not just pouring samples, selling wine, and promoting wine club memberships. Although winery visitors clearly expect to taste wines and perhaps tour the winery or walk vineyard paths, they often come expecting (or hoping for) something more.  That’s because sophisticated winery visitors don’t only visit wineries. They have many interests and develop expectations based upon their broader experiences. Wineries that want to attract these visitors need to step up to meet rising expectations.

Wine tourists and their rising standards have always been a priority at Chateau Ste Michelle, Washington state’s largest wine producer. When the current Woodinville production facility was constructed in 1976 the choice was made to locate it close to the Seattle population center, a few hours’ drive from the vineyards on the other side of the Cascade Mountains. The winery was built on the grounds of Hollywood Farm, the old Stimson Estate, and the main building was designed to closely resemble an iconic French chateau.

“The Chateau,” as we call it hereabouts, celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2017 and used that opportunity to give its visitor center a major renovation. Sue and I first visited this facility shortly after it opened in the late 1970s, when it was one of the most welcoming wine tourism destinations we found. But as the years have flown by a lot has changed. The number of visitors has increased and they have become more numerous, more diverse in terms of their wine knowledge  and also more sophisticated in terms of their expectations for a tourism experience. Inevitably, the tasting room itself had to change, too. And it has.

When I say that the wine tourism experience here has “grown up” I mean more than that it has matured and is now able to accommodate more visitors. One element of the growing up is to accommodate more diversity of tourist expectations and experiences.  The result is a textured program with many layers of opportunities.

For first time visitors, for example, the free (free!) tour and tasting is available as it has been here for as long as I can remember.  Visitors can upgrade their experience at the tasting room bar, where a variety of elevated tasting options are available for $10 to $15 per person — a bargain by Napa Valley standards.r-919411-1320418583-jpeg

Are You Experienced?

Winery visits in the old days were focused on tasting (and hopefully buying the wines) — a transactions approach. Now the state of the art is about relationships and creating opportunities to draw visitors more closely into the winery and its story so that they become both long term patrons and active brand ambassadors. I wrote in Around the World in Eighty Wines about the huge variety of experiences on offer at the Napa’s Robert Mondavi Winery and Chateau Ste Michelle has programs to match.

The Chateau Ste Michelle wine experience menu includes the above mentioned tours and tastings and moves on to a special small group single-vineyard and limited release tasting ($30 per person or $25 for winery club members), Cabernet-themed food and wine pairing experience ($100/$85), a”Sensory Sojourn” workshop ($65/$55), and a wine blending experience ($125/$95).

Small groups can also arrange to attend a sparkling wine seminar and tasting with food pairings ($55/$45), an opportunity to taste older vintage of Washington Bordeaux blends and Riesling wines ($55/$45), or grab a chance to learn how to blind taste like a Master Sommelier ($125/$95).

It is also possible to schedule visits to the Col Solare Bottega, where Red Mountain wines  produced in partnership with Tuscany’s Antinori family can be sampled, or a visit to the Enoteca, which highlights wines from Ste Michelle Wine Estate’s wineries and partners in Washington, Oregon, California, and around the world. I was pleased to see some famous Torres wines from Spain on the shelves when we visited. SMWE imports and distributes Torres wines in the U.S. as it does for Antinori, New Zealand’s Villa Maria, and French Champagne house Nicholas Feuillatte among others.

Bottom line: visitors cannot help but be impressed by the beautiful, welcoming grounds and imposing chateau facility and the delightful array of programs on offer. No wonder about 300,000 of them come each year both to visit the winery and to attend outdoor concerts on the big lawn behind the visitor center. Chateau Ste Michelle was conceived as a destination winery that’s what it is today.

The recent remodel has made it possible to expand the offerings to wine tourists so that they can custom-tailor a visit to get the experience that they seek.  Is this a model for the wine industry generally? No … and yes.

The No is easy. Most wineries don’t have the scale of production, volume of visitors, and the financial resources to make the sort of investment we see at Chateau Se Michelle possible. Only a few wineries around the globe can provide this level of service. In the last year of our travels, for example, I think only four wineries in Spain were at the same level: Freixenet, Codorníu, Torres, and Marqués Riscal.

But, Yes, this model is important for the industry to consider. Smaller wineries can offer a smaller range of experiences that are closely linked with locale, their history, and identity. Many visitors will appreciate the taste of authentic engagement as much as they do the wine itself.


Congratulations to Chateau Ste Michelle on their 50th anniversary and wonderful new visitor center. Special thanks to Lynda Eller and Linda Chauncey for their hospitality during or visit and to Hermes Navarro del Valle for his insights.