A Sneaky Preview of a Work in Progress: “Around the World in Eighty Wines”

80daysI am busy working on the third draft of my next book, which will be released at about this time next year (lots of work left to do!). It is called Around the World in Eighty Wines and I am sure you have already guessed that it is inspired by the famous Jules Verne adventure story.

It is too soon for details, but I thought I would tease you just a bit with a pair of maps. The first map (above) is my lame attempt to plot out the route of Jules Vernes’ hero Phileas Fogg. He started in London and worked his way from east to west around the world and back to London again.

My quest, which also starts in London, is to travel the world in eighty wines, not eighty days. Each individual wine needs to represent something important about wine and the places and people and cultures that produce wine. Since there are thousands of wines in the world, you might think this is an easy task. But you would be wrong (or at least that’s the premise of the book).

Telling the story of wine and its world with just eighty bottles — that’s insane. But I think it will be fun and I promise that the readers who come with me for the ride will find much to learn, love and laugh about along with (as in the Jules Verne story) some inevitable challenges and confounding frustrations.

80winesThis map (above) is my obviously amateur attempt to plot out the route that my book seems to be taking us (books have minds of their own — sometimes it is the story not the author who calls the shots).

If you compare the two maps you will see that circumnavigating with eighty wines is obviously much more difficult than doing it in eighty days. Just look at how much more complicated our route is than Phileas Fogg’s!

My maps are terrible, but that’s OK with me because I don’t want to give away too much just yet. Maybe you can guess where the journey will take us and perhaps you can even channel some of the wines. But I guarantee some surprises even for the most clairvoyant readers!

Where would you go on this adventure? Which wines would you choose to fill the eighty spots in your wine case? What fun we will have together finding the answers and the wines to go with them!


BBC presenter Michael Palin took on the 80 day version of this challenge in 1989. Here’s a snippet of the 7-part television series that recorded his adventures. Enjoy!

“Money, Taste & Wine” Honored as 2016 “Best in the World” Wine Writing


My new book Money, Taste, and Wine: It’s Complicated received this  year’s prize for “Best in the World” Wine Writing from Gourmand at the awards ceremony in Yantai, China on May 28, 2016.

My University of Puget Sound colleague Prof. Pierre Ly (shown above) accepted the award on my behalf, speaking in both English and Chinese. Pierre is in China lecturing and gathering material for the book that he and Cynthia Howson are writing about the Chinese wine industry.

Congratulations to all the winners, especially Gerard Bertrand (Le Vin à la belle étoile) and Andrea Zanfi (Prosecco on the Road) for best wine book and Suzanne Mustacich for best digital wine book (Thirsty Dragon).gourmand

Congratulations and a personal shout-out to Beate Joubert. Her book Taste of the Little Karoo won the “best in the world” bronze medal in the Local Cuisine cookbook category. We had a delicious lunch at Beate’s restaurant at the Joubert-Tradauw winery in Barrydale when we visited South Africa. Her husband Meyer and son Andreas are featured in the final chapter of Money, Taste, and Wine.

Thanks to Gourmand International for this honor. Thanks to my publisher Rowman & Littlefied and my editor Susan McEachern their valuable contributions to Money, Taste, and Wine. Special thanks to Pierre Ly for teaching me so much and representing me at the awards ceremony and to Édouard Cointreau for his encouragement and support.

Money, Taste, and Wine Short-Listed for Two Gourmand International Awards

gourmandMy recent book Money, Taste, and Wine: It’s Complicated has been short-listed for two Gourmand International awards.. The winners will be announced in ceremonies in Yantai, China later this month.

The awards are for best wine book and best wine writing. I’ll paste the list of finalists in these categories below.Click on this link to see all the award listings.

Thanks to Gourmand International for this honor. Congratulations and good luck to all the finalists.1442234636

Best book of the year

Australia – Varietal Wines, James Halliday (Harper Collins)
Belgium – All Belgium beers, Stichting Kunstboek
France – Le Vin a la bonne etoile, Gerard Bertrand ( La Martiniere )
Germany – Deutsche Wein und Deutsche Kuche ( Callwey )
Italy – Prosecco on the road, Andrea Zanfi ( S & B )
South Korea Korean Wines and Spirits, Jeff Koehler ( Seoul Selection )
Spain – Economía del vino en España y el Mundo ( Cajamar Valencia )
Sweden – Whisky Rebellion, Richard Lundborg ( Bladh by bladh )
USA – Money, taste and wine, Mike Veseth (Rowman & Littlefield)

 Wine writing

Australia – True stories, Barossa winemakers, Bernadette Kaeding
Bolivia – Diccionario Enciclopedico universal Del vino, Roberto Arce
Chile – Patrimonio vitivinicola ( Biblioteca Nacional )
France-Grainsensible, Olivier Humbrecht, ( Tonnerre de l’ Est )
USA – Money, taste and wine, Mike Veseth (Rowman & Littlefield)

Flashback Friday: Malbec World Day

Wines of Argentina has designated Sunday April 17 Malbec World Day 2016. That’s only a week away, so you had better get started thinking about how you will celebrate this holiday. Please use the comments section below to share your Malbec World Day plans.

Malbec World Day is a good excuse for a Flashback Friday column since Malbec has appeared frequently in these pages in the context of the Argentinean wine industry. Malbec was, for example, the subject of an award-winning  documentary called “Boom Varietal: the Rise of Argentine Malbec”  (see video trailer above) that provided my first (and so far only) opportunity to be a supporting character in a film.

Here is a column from back in 2011 that honors all Malbec producers by revisiting Mendel Wines (a bottle of Mendel Malbec is on the short list of possibilities for our Malbec World Day celebration along with a “flashback” tribute Malbec from Colomé called Auténtico).


Balance is the key to great wine (and profitable wine business, too). I was reminded of this truth many times during our visit to Mendoza, where wine makers are trying to chart a course between and among several extremes:

  • Competitive export sales versus the challenging domestic market;
  • Reliable value wine sales versus potentially more profitable premium products;
  • Popular and successful Malbec versus TNBT — The (speculative and uncertain) Next Big Thing.

The key to long term success involves finding the right balance in this complex economic environment.

I want to use this post to consider three types of balance that I think are particularly interesting in Mendoza – the balance between crisis and opportunity,  local and international winemaking influences and the simple tension between the old and the new.  We learned about all three dimensions during our brief visit to Mendel Wines in Lujan de Cuyo.

Crisis and Opportunity

Mendel is both very old and quite new.  The vineyards are old, planted in 1928. Somehow these Malbec vines survived the ups and downs of the Argentinean economy. The winery is almost as old and has a certain decaying charm. It stands in stark contrast to Salentein, O. Fournier, the Catena Zapata pyramid and the many other starkly modernist structures that have sprung up in this part of the world.

The winery project is quite new. Mendel is a partnership between Anabelle Sielecki and Roberto de la Mota and is the result of a balance between crisis and opportunity. When economic crisis struck Argentina ten years ago, opportunities were created for those with vision and entrepreneurial spirit. Anabelle and Roberto seized the moment and purchased these old vines and well-worn structures for their new super premium winery project.

That their impulse was timely and wise may not have been obvious at the time (crises are like that), but it is perfectly clear now. Wine Advocate named Mendel one of nine “Best of the Best” Argentinean wineries in a recent issue.[1]

Old and New

The winemaking that goes on in Mendel is also a combination of old and new. The technology is modern, of course, with stainless steel and French oak very visible. The setting, however, constantly reminds you of the past and the vineyard’s and winery’s history. Walking through the winery, for example, I was struck by the big original concrete fermenting tanks – a blast from the past for sure.

No, we don’t use them to ferment the wines anymore, Cecilia Albino told us, but we put them to good use. Peek inside. Sure enough, the tanks were filled with oak barrels full of wine aging quietly in the cool environment.

Mendel also illustrates the balance between local and global that characterizes wine in Argentina, where much of the capital and many of the winemakers come from abroad.  Roberto de la Mota, partner and chief winemaker at Mendel, personifies this balance. Roberto is the son of  Raúl de la Mota, who is sometimes said to be Argentina’s “winemaker of the [20th] century” so important was his work in developing quality wine in this country.

Roberto naturally grew up in the wine business both here and in France, where he sought advanced training on the advice of Emile Peynaud. He was the winemaker at Terrazas, Chandon’s still wine project in Mendoza, and then at Cheval des Andes, a winery with connections to Château Cheval Blanc. I think it is fair to say that Roberto’s resume represents a balance between local and global, between deep understanding of Mendoza terroir and knowledge that perhaps only international influences can provide.

Local and Global

I asked Roberto if it was important that Mendel is an Argentinean project and not owned by a foreign multinational. Yes of course, he said, but he hesitated a bit and I think I see why. Many of the influences and markets are international, but people, vines and inspiration are  purely local. Not one or another, but intertwined, balanced.

And this thirst for a complex balance defines the future. Talking with Anabelle over coffee in Buenos Aires, she was ambitious to break into new markets – Hong Kong, China, and so forth. Anabelle is an architect — another field where global and local intersect.

Meeting with Roberto at the winery in Mendoza, he was interested in learning even more about his vines and terroir so as to better develop their potential. And to bring more of the classic Bordeaux grape varieties (like Petit Verdot) into the mix.

Mendel has charted its balanced course quickly, purposefully and well.  It is a perfect illustration of both the tensions that define wine in Argentina and the potential for success if a clear but balanced path is boldly taken.

[1] The other “Best of the Best” wineries in Wine Advocate issue 192 are Achaval Ferrer, Alta Vista, Catena Zapata, Viña Cobos, Colomé Reserva, Luca, Tikal and Yacochuya.

Wine Economist Year in Review & Looking Ahead to 2016

Past and Future - Two-Way Street Sign2015 was a busy year here at The Wine Economist and 2016 is shaping up to be pretty interesting, too.

Looking Back at 2015

In January I spoke in the “State of the Industry” session at the Unified Wine & Grape Symposium in Sacramento. Then we left for New York City where I spoke at “Vino 2015,” a conference and trade show organized by the Italian Trade Commission.

North to Alaska: I traveled to Juneau and Anchorage to give talks and do a fund-raising wine dinner for the World Affairs Council chapters in those cities. Then it was east to Boise, Idaho to speak at the Idaho Wine Commission annual meeting. Both Anchorage and Boise were surprisingly warm, but …

It was really really cold in Ontario when I visited in March to speak to the Winery & Grower Alliance of Ontario meetings, but the people were warm and it was a great experience. Then a quick trip to Walla Walla to talk about wine industry at a regional business summit.

South to California in May, to speak at the Ramona Valley AVA symposium, then a fund-raiser for the Admiral Theatre Foundation in Bremerton along with my friends from Hedges Family Wines. Sue and I were delighted to be invited to the 50-year retrospective tasting of Oregon’s Eyrie Vineyards in Portland, too.

Italy and a Few Surprises

June’s highlight was lecturing at the Conegliano Wine School in Italy and visiting with winemakers in the Veneto and Friuli.While we were in Cormons I got word that around the globe in Yantai, China the Wine Economist had received the Gourmand International prize for the “Best in the World” wine blog. Incredible.

Back home it was north again in July, to speak at the British Columbia Wine Institute annual meetings, then south to Napa Valley to talk at the California Association of Winegrape Growers summer conference.

Two books came out in the fall, my newest volume Money, Taste, and Wine: It’s Complicated and the paperback edition of Extreme Wine. 

We visited Barboursville Vineyards while in Virginia to meet with Luca Paschina and we were lucky to able to meet up with Marc Hochar in Richmond and taste some older vintages of Lebanon’s Chateau Musar on the same trip.

I spoke at the Seattle meetings of the Academy of International Business and then flew to Milan to participate in a discussion on sustainability organized in conjunction with the big SIMEI trade show there.

The year ended on a high note when we learned that Money, Taste, and Wine will receive the Gourmand International award for the year’s best wine writing in a U.S. book. As the U.S. winner it is a finalist for the “Best in the World” award to be revealed in Yantai, China in May 2016.

What’s Ahead for 2016?

The travel schedule is coming together for 2016. I am looking forward to going back to Sacramento at the end of January for my fifth year moderating the “State of the Industry” program at the Unified Wine & Grape Symposium.

A few weeks later we will head to Napa where Sue and I are on the faculty for the Professional Wine Writers Symposium.

Then it is north to Anchorage for another World Affairs Council fund raising program before returning to Walla Walla for the big Reveal Walla Walla trade auction.

It looks like we will be going to Portugal in May to speak at a conference organized by Wines of Alentejo and later to Seattle for Riesling Rendezvous, an international conference sponsored by Chateau Ste Michelle and Dr Loosen.

That’s what’s on tap for 2016 so far, but the year is still young. No wait — it actually hasn’t even started yet. Who knows where the wine rivers and roads will take us.

That’s the look back and ahead. Hope to see you somewhere on our travels in 2016. In the meantime, cheers to all! And have a great New Year.


Sometimes I feel like I have been everywhere in the wine world to speak to wine industry groups, but the truth is … I’m not even close!

Wine Spectator Review of “Money, Taste, and Wine” and a Shameless Gift Idea

The end of the year is upon us and you know what that means! Time to wrap those holiday gifts and time for Wine Spectator, America’s best-selling wine magazine, to announce their list of Top 100 wines for 2015.

Top Wines … and Book Reviews, Too

The Top 100  issue of Wine Spectator is also the annual book review issue and I was honored to have my most recent book, Money, Taste and Wine: It’s Complicated, included in the collection. In fact it is the lead review.

Thanks to Tom Matthews (who wrote the review) and the other Wine Spectator editors for this. So many great wine books were released this year that it is an honor just to make the list.

Here’s a list of the other books in the review article. Nice company!

  • Barolo MGA by Alessandro Masnaghetti
  • Tangled Vines by Frances Dinkelspiel
  • A Natural History of Wine by Ian Tattersall and Rob DeSalle
  • Wine, Moon and Stars by Gérard Betrand
  • American Wine by Tom Acitelli
  • The Winemaker by Richard G Peterson
  • True Taste by Matt Kramer and
  • Thirsty Dragon by Suzanne Mustacich

Caffeinated, Catchy and Quick

Wine Spectator had some nice things to say about Money, Taste and Wine. My favorite line is “A caffeinated writing style, catchy themes and rapid jumps from one subject to the next make the book a quick and lively read.” That’s sounds a little like a literary tasting note!

That’s not to say that they liked everything about the book and I’m taking their constructive criticism as a challenge to do even better as I work on my next book, tentatively scheduled for 2017.

Here’s the Shameless Part

In the meantime, do you have a wine lover on your gift list? If so, you might want to consider a book — best thing ever to give or receive, don’t you think? OK, maybe next-best to wine itself. Here’s my Amazon list of favorite gift books, perfect for your favorite wine friends.

Talk about shameless self-promotion. Cheers, everyone!

Gourmand International Award for “Money, Taste, and Wine”

I’ve just learned that my new book Money, Taste, and Wine: It’s Complicated has won an international award for best drinks writing in a U.S. book this year.

The award comes from Gourmand International and will be presented in Yantai, China on  May 28, 2016 at the annual awards ceremony. As the U.S. winner, Money, Taste, and Wine is a finalist for the “Best in the World” award in this category, the winner of which will be revealed in Yantai. Very exciting!

The other national finalists and winners in other categories of the awards will be posted on Gourmand International website in February.

Sincere thanks to the Gourmand International  judges for this honor. Here is a video about the 2015 awards in Yantai. Enjoy!