Publisher’s Weekly & Booklist Review “Around the World in Eighty Wines”

9781442257368Sue and I are back from Mendoza and gearing up for the release of my next book in a couple of weeks. Around the World in Eighty Wines draws its inspiration from the people we have met and the wines we’ve tasted as we have circled the globe in recent years. Can’t wait for my copy to arrive!

Publisher’s Weekly provides pre-publication reviews to alert bookstores and libraries about interesting and important new books they might want to purchase. I was pleased with the Publisher’s Weekly review of Eighty Wines, which seemed to capture the spirit of the book.  Here is an excerpt of the review:

Veseth chooses the wines he profiles based on the ability of each to excite the palate, and the imagination: “Each of [the] eighty wines must tell a story, [but they] must not just each tell their own story…. They must collectively form a picture and tell a story that reveals a greater truth,” he writes. As a result, reading his book is rather like attending a swanky cocktail party: it contains a vast and varied buffet, with loads of interesting conversational tidbits.

PW’s Daniel Lefferts was intrigued by the book review and asked for a Publisher’s Weekly interview about the book’s back-story. Here is my favorite Q&A from the interview:

What surprised you most while working on this book?
If you take this journey with me, you go to places where you expect to find wine, like France and Italy and California, and you go to places that you would never think could make wine, or where anybody would make wine. [You] see how wine inspires people to overcome such natural and political and human odds. … The power of wine … to transform how people think about food, how they think about themselves and the places that they live: it’s inspiring.

Booklist has also published a brief review, which captures the spirit of adventure that drives Eighty Wines and comes close to revealing the surprise ending. Surprise ending? Well, Jules Verne’s Around the World in Eighty Days has a plot twist in the final chapter and, inspired by Verne, my book does so, too. I think readers will smile when the twist is revealed — it makes me smile just thinking about it!

I hope my readers will be as inspired by Around the World in Eighty Wines and we were by the people, places and wines we encountered doing the research. November 1 is the official release date!

Ten Years Later … The Wine Economist Celebrates its 10th Anniversary

Next week — on Memorial Day, in fact — the Wine Economist will celebrate its 10th anniversary. Ten years of regular columns about the world of wine as seen from an economist’s perspective.

The very first column, which is reproduced below, was an account of my visit to family-owned Fielding Hills winery, one of Washington’s best, to help bottle the 2005 vintage. The bottling line was a volunteer operation back then, fueled by enthusiasm and steady sips of the wine, which I compared to Adam Smith’s famous “pin factory” example of the benefits of division of labor.

A lot has changed since 2007. Fielding Hills’ reputation has grown, its lineup of wines expanded, and the cramped garage-style winery replaced with an efficient production facility and beautiful tasting room over-looking scenic Lake Chelan.

A lot has changed at the Wine Economist, too. I could never have guessed that this first column would slowly and with much effort turn into something more, spinning off four wine books, several awards (wine book of the year, best wine blog, best wine writing) and a series of lectures that has taken us around the world. Amazing!

Tenth anniversary? That calls for a celebration. I think we’ll open a bottle of Fielding Hills wine! Cheers to the Wade family and Fielding Hills for getting this column off to a good start.

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Wine Economist Column #1:

Bottling the 2005 at Fielding Hills (May 29, 2007)

I spent the weekend after commencement in Wenatchee, Washington helping Mike and Karen Wade and their friends bottle the 2005 vintage of Fielding Hills. I got to drink some great wine, meet some wonderful people and learn more about the wine business. Here are some photos (courtesy of Dave Seago) and some observations.

The Wades are orchardists and fruit distributors in Wenatchee, which is the heart of Washington Apple country. They got the wine bug a few years ago and now run an 800 case operation from a building near their home, overlooking the Columbia River. The grapes come from vines they own near Matawa on the Wahluke Slope, further down the Columbia. They make reds — Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Syrah, Cabernet Franc and a blend called RiverBend red. These wines are not easy to find (remember: only 800 cases total) but they have received rave notices in the wine press: Wine Enthusiast rated them all between 91/100 and 95/100 points in its December 2006 assessment of the 2004 vintage. They are all good, the magazines and web sites say, the only question is which one is best.

I know the Wades through their daughter Robin who is one of my students at the University of Puget Sound. She knows about my interest in the wine business, so when they needed volunteer labor for the annual bottling weekend, she knew who to call.

I have taken dozens of tours of large wine-making operations, so it was interesting to see the process first-hand and on a very human scale. I hope the photos capture something of the process. We bottled the Cab, a blend featuring 76% Cabernet Sauvignon, on Friday afternoon. The first step was get the appropriate barrels of wine out of storage and to carefully pump the right proportions of the right wines into a large stainless blending tank. From there, the wine moved to the assembly line, where I worked alongside about a dozen of the Wades’ friends and neighbors.

The bottling process reminded me of Adam Smith’s famous pin factory example of the division of labor. One person (1) brought in pallets that contained cases of empty wine bottles. A second person (2) removed the bottles from the cases onto a table so that another worker (3) could invert them over a nitrogen supply, which removed any oxygen. The bottles were then (4) filled with wine on a six-bottle machine (see photo), then corked (5). A foil closure was then placed over the cork top (6) and secured firmly using a surprisingly nasty electric device (that was my job — #7). Then the bottles were wiped down (workers 8 and 9) before going through a label operation (10), being loaded back into boxes (11) that were sealed and stacked (12) and then moved out on the pallets they came in on. It took us about six hours to bottle 200 cases of Cabernet Sauvignon on Friday afternoon. We did 150 cases of the RiverBend Blend in four hours on Saturday morning. My reward? Wonderful family-style meals with my co-workers and one bottle of each of the wines I worked on, autographed by my fellow volunteers.

One thing that you can’t see in the photos is the fuel that kept the volunteers going: it was the wine we were bottling, drawn straight from the barrel. Good juice, in my opinion. Can’t wait to taste it when it’s had a bit of time in the bottle. (Expected release date: October 2007.)

One thing I learned from this is that although 800 cases of wine is a tiny operation by the scale of today’s wine business today, it is still a very significant investment of time and energy. I thought we would never come to the end up those 200 cases (2400 individual bottles) of Cabernet on Friday afternoon!

Because they have been so successful, both in terms of wine quality and wine economics, the Wades are planning to take the next step — to expand production from 800 cases to 2400 cases. This is a big step, since the business model changes with the higher volumes. Family labor plus volunteer help at key points works fine for wineries producing 1000 cases or less, but a bigger operation means hired help and higher fixed costs. The marketing end changes, too. The Wades prefer to sell most of their wine direct to customers rather than to discount it in order to get it into wine shops and restaurants. Given their stellar ratings, they have a good opportunity to build a “wine club” list that will automatically take most of their output, matching demand and supply very efficiently. Building a bigger winery will mean matching a bigger demand to their bigger supply.

Mike Wade told me what it takes to make good wine — it’s in the fruit, he said. The economics of wine is in the market — matching demand and supply. I would say that the Wades understand both the fruit side of their operation and the market side, too.

Around the World in Eighty Wines: Racing to the Finish Line

51ppzy7bwzl-_sx332_bo1204203200_Sue and I spend so much time travelling to visit the world’s wine regions and speaking to wine industry groups that we sometimes feel a bit like Phileas Fogg and Passepartout, the characters in Jules Verne’s novel Around the World in Eighty Days.

That feeling and the experiences that go with it are one of the inspirations for my next book, Around the World in Eighty Wines, which will be released on November 1, 2017. (You can already pre-order it on Amazon.com!).

Although our travels continue (we are off to Spain next week and then to Cyprus in May), at some point it is necessary to draw a line and declare the book itself finished. And that’s what I did today, when I finished proofing the copy-edited manuscript and sent it in to my production editor at Rowman & Littlefield right on deadline.

The Wine Economist will take a break for a few weeks while we are in Spain for the FEV General Assembly meetings and visits with winemakers there. Circle back in a few weeks to see what’s new at The Wine Economist. Cheers!

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I asked a few friends to read the manuscript and write brief “blurbs” for the book cover. Here is what we have so far. Enjoy!

This captivating book is about more than just wine—it’s about human nature, travel, and enjoyment. As the Rick Steves of the wine world, Mike’s talents as a writer and storyteller transport the reader to a new territory to explore as each of the eighty wines are opened.
Howard Soon, Master Winemaker, Sandhill Wines

Mike Veseth takes the reader on a Phileas Fogg–inspired odyssey in search of the answer to the question: why wine? The solution is a true global adventure—a mosaic of stories that illuminate wine beyond the glass to embody the enduring human spirit through controversy, love, endurance, loss, and hope. I was packing my bags to join the journey before the end of part one. A must-read for all who love wine and life.
Michelle Williams, freelance writer and author of the Rockin Red Blog

Like a master blender, Mike Veseth stimulates the mind’s appetite with a wonderful balance of illusion and substance, as complex as a fine wine.Structured with cultural nuance and imagination, this delightful book is a must-read for serious wine enthusiasts and neophytes alike. Circumnavigating the world in eighty wines should be enjoyed with a glass of your favorite origin in hand.
George Sandeman, Sogrape Vinhos, Portugal

Mike Veseth has deftly captured the magical worldwide journey of wine. This is a great rollicking educational roller coaster of a ride that the global fraternity of wine enthusiasts will embrace.
Robert Hill-Smith, vigneron, Yalumba, Australia

Wine Economist World Tour Update: Valladolid, Spain and Paphos, Cyprus

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The “Wine Economist World Tour” is on the road again and I thought you might want to know about the upcoming stops.

FEV General Assembly / Valladolid, Spain

Sue and I will be in historic Valladolid, Spain on the 28th of March. I’m giving a keynote address on the dynamics of the global wine market and how they apply to Spain at  the Federación Española Del Vino General Assembly.

I am honored to be invited to address this important group and am looking forward to meeting everyone and learning more about Spain and its wines during our visit. Sue and I have immersed ourselves in Spanish wine research, revisiting old friends and seeing what is new on the market here. Can’t wait to continue this work in Spain!

Cyprus Wine Competition / Paphos, Cyprus

We will attend the 10th Cyprus Wine Competition in Paphos, Cyprus on May 2-6. I will give a seminar on “Secrets of the World’s Most Respected Wine Regions” with lessons that might be useful to the Cyprus wine industry.

Many people think of Cyprus as a great place for a sunny holiday — and it is — but it has a rich culture, an amazing wine history, and a bright wine future, too. Its distinctive dessert wine, Commandaria, was once one of the most prized wines in the world. It just might be the particular wine with the longest history of continuous production.

Cyprus today is making the transition from an industry dominated by  bulk wine exports to a focus on high quality bottled wine and we will be interested to learn more about the industry, meet the wine industry leaders, and taste the progress they have made.

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There are several more World Tour stops on the horizon, including Napa Valley, Romania, Colorado, and I few more I can’t talk about yet. Watch this space for details.

What’s Ahead for the Wine Economy? 2017 Unified Wine & Grape Symposium

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Sue and I are looking forward to the 2017 Unified Wine & Grape Symposium, which is set for January 24-27, 2017 in Sacramento, California. The Unified Symposium is the largest wine industry gathering in North America, drawing as many as 14,000 people for the sessions, trade show, and gatherings.

This year’s conference features a number of interesting sessions, some of which are presented in both English and Spanish. I will paste the program below for your inspection. Three sessions particularly caught my eye this year.

And Now For Something Completely Different200x200

Eric Asimov, the New York Times‘ wine critic, will give the luncheon address on Tuesday January 24. I am thinking that Asimov’s talk will be a bit different from the 2016 lunch speaker — Fred Franzia!

Fred didn’t pull many punches in challenging his audience and gave us a lot to think about. I expect Asimov’s take to be completely  different, but equally challenging.

Stephen Rannekleiv of Rabobank and Damien Wilson of Sonoma State University will present an analysis of “The Global Market for Wine” on Wednesday afternoon and I will certainly be in the audience. What a big topic! I’m looking forward to seeing what particular trends they pick out and how they see the wine economy developing given all the economic and political changes going on.

State of the Industry

The “State of the Industry” session will go live at 8:30 on Wednesday morning and I will be back as both moderator and speaker. The program is always interesting and draws a huge standing-room-only crowd as the photo above shows.

Joining me this year are three terrific speakers: Nat DiBuduo of Allied Grape Growers,
Danny Brager from The Nielsen Company and Glenn Proctor of Ciatti Company. I’ll be interested to hear what Nat, Danny and Glenn have to say about the wine industry in 2016 and what’s ahead for 2017 and beyond. They really know their stuff — should be a terrific session. Hope to see you at the Unified. Cheers!

Unified Wine & Grape Symposium Program

Tuesday January 24

7:30 am – 6:30 pm Registration

11:30 am – 1:30 pm Keynote Speaker Luncheon
Eric Asimov, New York Times, New York
Separate Registration Fee Required

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm Sauvignon blanc: Vine to Bottle (includes tasting)
Joint Grapegrowing & Winemaking Breakout Session

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm Focus, Focus, Focus: Listen to Learn
Marketing/Public Relations Breakout Session

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm Finding Value in Sustainability
Business/Operations Breakout Session

4:30 pm – 6:30 pm Welcome Reception

Wednesday January 25

7:30 am – 5:30 pm Registration

8:30 am – 11:00 am State of the Industry
General Session

9:00 am – 6:00 pm Exhibits Open

1:00 pm – 2:15 pm Not Your Ordinary Yeast: Using Innovated Strains and Fermentation Techniques to Increase Wine Quality and Drive Wine Styles
Winemaking Breakout Session

1:30 pm – 3:30 pm Looking Forward: How Grapevine Clean Plant Strategies Can be Improved
Grapegrowing Breakout Session

1:30 pm – 3:30 pm The Global Market for Wine
Business & Operations Breakout Session

1:30 pm – 3:30 pm Making the Most of Your Message: Building a Bridge Between Winegrowing, Marketing & PR to Effectively Reach Today’s Consumer
Marketing/Public Relations Breakout Session

2:30 pm – 3:45 pm Eggs, Uprights, Puncheons and More: Making Your Best Wine in Unusual Containers
Winemaking Breakout Session

4:00 pm – 6:00 pm Regional Wine Tasting

6:15 pm – 8:00 pm UC Davis Viticulture & Enology Alumni, Students, Faculty and Friends Reception

Thursday January 26

8:00 am – 4:00 pm Registration

9:00 am – 4:00 pm Exhibits Open

9:00 am – 11:30 am Adapt or Go Extinct: Removing Barriers to Our Industry’s Success
General Session

9:00 am – 10:30 am Presentada en español (Presented in Spanish)

Tecnologías de vanguardia para la producción de uva y elaboración de vino
Sesión General en español

Leading-edge Technology in Grapegrowing and Winemaking
Spanish General Session

10:45 am – Noon Presentada en español (Presented in Spanish)

La decisión inteligente de utilizar material de propagación limpio
Sesión en Español de Viticultura

The Smart Decision of Using Clean Plant Material
Spanish Grapegrowing Breakout Session

10:45 am – Noon Presentada en español (Presented in Spanish)

El Arte de Encontrar el Balance Ideal de un Vino
Sesión en Español de Enología

The Art of Finding a Wine’s Ideal Balance (Sweet Spot)
Spanish Winemaking Breakout Session

11:30 am – 1:00 pm Hosted Buffet Luncheon

1:15 pm – 3:15 pm Cooperage Alternatives
Winemaking English Tour

1:30 pm – 3:30 pm Presentada en español (Presented in Spanish)

Alternativas de Tonelería
Tour en Español de Enología

1:15 pm – 2:15 pm FSMA – Food Safety Modernization Act
Winemaking Breakout Session

1:15 pm – 3:15 pm Beyond the Tasting Room: Marketing Your Wines Today
Marketing/Public Relations Breakout Session

1:15 pm – 3:15 pm Vineyard Mechanization: Moving to the “No Touch Vineyard?
Grapegrowing Breakout Session

1:15 pm – 3:15 pm To Grow or Not to Grow: While the Common Wisdom Is That Growth is Good, is it Really? And if it is Good for You, How to do It?
Business & Operations Breakout Session

1:15 pm – 3:15 pm Mechanization
Grapegrowing English Tour

1:30 pm – 3:30 pm Presentada en español (Presented in Spanish)

Mecanización
Tour en Español de Viticultura

2:30 pm – 3:30 pm Beyond the Bottle:  Packaging Innovations for Winemakers
Winemaking Breakout Session

A Sneaky Preview of a Work in Progress: “Around the World in Eighty Wines”

80daysI am busy working on the third draft of my next book, which will be released at about this time next year (lots of work left to do!). It is called Around the World in Eighty Wines and I am sure you have already guessed that it is inspired by the famous Jules Verne adventure story.

It is too soon for details, but I thought I would tease you just a bit with a pair of maps. The first map (above) is my lame attempt to plot out the route of Jules Vernes’ hero Phileas Fogg. He started in London and worked his way from east to west around the world and back to London again.

My quest, which also starts in London, is to travel the world in eighty wines, not eighty days. Each individual wine needs to represent something important about wine and the places and people and cultures that produce wine. Since there are thousands of wines in the world, you might think this is an easy task. But you would be wrong (or at least that’s the premise of the book).

Telling the story of wine and its world with just eighty bottles — that’s insane. But I think it will be fun and I promise that the readers who come with me for the ride will find much to learn, love and laugh about along with (as in the Jules Verne story) some inevitable challenges and confounding frustrations.

80winesThis map (above) is my obviously amateur attempt to plot out the route that my book seems to be taking us (books have minds of their own — sometimes it is the story not the author who calls the shots).

If you compare the two maps you will see that circumnavigating with eighty wines is obviously much more difficult than doing it in eighty days. Just look at how much more complicated our route is than Phileas Fogg’s!

My maps are terrible, but that’s OK with me because I don’t want to give away too much just yet. Maybe you can guess where the journey will take us and perhaps you can even channel some of the wines. But I guarantee some surprises even for the most clairvoyant readers!

Where would you go on this adventure? Which wines would you choose to fill the eighty spots in your wine case? What fun we will have together finding the answers and the wines to go with them!

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BBC presenter Michael Palin took on the 80 day version of this challenge in 1989. Here’s a snippet of the 7-part television series that recorded his adventures. Enjoy!

“Money, Taste & Wine” Honored as 2016 “Best in the World” Wine Writing

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My new book Money, Taste, and Wine: It’s Complicated received this  year’s prize for “Best in the World” Wine Writing from Gourmand at the awards ceremony in Yantai, China on May 28, 2016.

My University of Puget Sound colleague Prof. Pierre Ly (shown above) accepted the award on my behalf, speaking in both English and Chinese. Pierre is in China lecturing and gathering material for the book that he and Cynthia Howson are writing about the Chinese wine industry.

Congratulations to all the winners, especially Gerard Bertrand (Le Vin à la belle étoile) and Andrea Zanfi (Prosecco on the Road) for best wine book and Suzanne Mustacich for best digital wine book (Thirsty Dragon).gourmand

Congratulations and a personal shout-out to Beate Joubert. Her book Taste of the Little Karoo won the “best in the world” bronze medal in the Local Cuisine cookbook category. We had a delicious lunch at Beate’s restaurant at the Joubert-Tradauw winery in Barrydale when we visited South Africa. Her husband Meyer and son Andreas are featured in the final chapter of Money, Taste, and Wine.

Thanks to Gourmand International for this honor. Thanks to my publisher Rowman & Littlefied and my editor Susan McEachern their valuable contributions to Money, Taste, and Wine. Special thanks to Pierre Ly for teaching me so much and representing me at the awards ceremony and to Édouard Cointreau for his encouragement and support.